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Maplewood residents help make realistic front yard fall display

‘We have had quite a few people walk by and stop to look at the display, so the residents are proud’

Applefest may have been cancelled in the town of Brighton due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, but that didn’t stop Maplewood residents and staff from pitching in to keep the spirit of the annual celebration of all things apple alive.

Applefest is a flagship event held every September in Brighton that features a street fair, a parade and a variety of entertainment, and Maplewood residents and staff members always attend.

To keep things safe during the pandemic, the municipality encouraged local businesses to create festive autumn displays on their property, so the folks at Maplewood decided to get in on the action.

Residents and life enrichment aide Rosanne Blackburn created a front yard scene that features a very lifelike display of a Maplewood nurse and a resident – both wearing face masks to promote safety – surrounding a table covered with apples and a bag of flour to make apple pies.

Residents were involved with creating the display by helping with crafts, such as colouring foam balls red and green to make the apples.

They also glued the foam apples to a cupcake stand Rosanne gave them so the replica fruit wouldn’t blow away.

There’s even a homemade apple tree with laminated apples dangling from it the residents made, and the flour bag included in the display was crafted by residents from a potato sack.

With social distancing protocols in effect, Rosanne brought a few residents outside to stuff the display nurse with garbage bags, and residents decided on how everything was arranged.

Rosanne says the display is so realistic some pedestrians have had to look twice when passing by.

“We have had quite a few people walk by and stop to look at the display, so the residents are proud,” she says.

The display was completed Sept. 18 and will remain on Maplewood’s front lawn for the next few days.

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Province needs to address LTC staffing issues to better face second COVID wave

The need for more staff ‘is a big issue that’s affecting health-care providers across the country, and it’s seriously affecting long-term care homes,’ says OMNI CEO Patrick McCarthy

With health experts predicting a second wave of COVID-19 spread to begin within the coming months, the Ontario government needs to address staffing issues in the long-term care sector to help homes better prevent and manage infection, says OMNI Health Care president and CEO Patrick McCarthy.

Given that long-term-care home residents are among the most vulnerable population groups, it’s crucial that additional funding be earmarked to address staffing levels of front-line workers and provide staff training, both of which will be key to preparing for the second infection wave, he adds.

“(Staffing) is a big issue that’s affecting health-care providers across the country, and it’s seriously affecting long-term care homes,” McCarthy says in an interview with The OMNIway.

While long-term-care home staff members have worked tirelessly to keep residents safe from the highly contagious virus, the first wave of COVID-19 impacted homes across Ontario and Canada.

Long-term care homes having access to more front-line staff members will improve residents’ safety, McCarthy says.

All long-term care homes in Ontario receive funding specifically earmarked to provide nursing, personal care, programs and support services with no element of profit or surplus retained from the provision of those health services. As a result, funding for additional care staff needs to come from the province.

Private long-term care providers across Ontario have asked the Ford government to increase the supply of personal support workers (PSWs) by supporting innovative training programs, including on-the-job training and remote training.

McCarthy adds that the COVID-19 pandemic affects long-term-care home staff members beyond their work inside the homes.

For example, there may be instances where people cannot come to work due to outbreaks in the community or in schools, and there needs to be staffing levels to in place to ensure there’s always a ready supply of front-line care workers.

“It’s all a package that affects the availability of staff and the homes’ ability to staff during the pandemic,” he says.

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Safe reading and discussion groups restart at Willows Estate

Residents enjoy discussing current events, and having this program back has been important to them, says LEA

Willows Estate life enrichment aide (LEA) Azaria Kanda has restarted a long-popular reading and discussion group for the Aurora, Ont. long-term care home’s residents with social-distancing in place.

Azaria says reading and keeping up to date with current issues and events is a favourite activity for residents, and it’s a passion he shares with them.

Before the COVID-19 pandemic began in March, there were regular group reading and discussion groups for residents. However, because group programming was suspended in Ontario long-term care homes for three months after the pandemic began, the groups were not able to meet.

With restrictions easing, Azaria has been hosting two smaller reading-discussion groups on both floors at the Willows, with social distancing in effect.

During the discussions, residents talk about subjects ranging from politics to sports. But stories about current events residents read in newspapers are the favourite, Azaria says.

“The residents are very aware and they really stay on top of the headlines – and I think it’s one thing for them to hear or read about (news) and it’s another thing for them to expand on that (with discussions) to give their point of view and to talk amongst one another,” he says.

Indeed, there has been a lot to talk about in 2020. Aside from the pandemic, there has been increased awareness about racial injustice and mounting concern about the state of the economy.

“Those three topics have really been at the forefront,” Azaria says.

During the week ending Sept. 12, the groups talked about the pandemic. Last week they discussed racial injustices. This week they are scheduled to talk about the economic situation.

“A lot of the residents were born in the 1920s or 1930s, so they’ve lived through many decades, and there’s always a common thread to find because each generation has had its (struggles), whether that be war or political turmoil,” Azaria says.

“So, it’s really interesting to talk about that common thread, to talk about what’s happening now, and a lot of the residents don’t find it that surprising to be going through this because they’ve gone through major cultural shifting moments before.”

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Kentwood Park team among essential workers honoured by Shriners

Members of the local temple toured the region with a float to thank health-care workers and others for their efforts during the pandemic

Members of the local Shriners temple showed up at Kentwood Park this summer to show their support for everyone working at the Picton, Ont. long-term care home.

Members of the Belleville and District Shrine Club travelled around some of eastern Ontario’s counties in a motor home and float this summer to pay tribute to essential workers for their efforts during the ongoing global COVID-19 pandemic.

“It gives these people a little break from their busy work days and they really seem to appreciate it,” Shriner spokesman Clarence Stevenson told the Belleville Intelligencer in June.

“We’re really lucky to have them taking care of the community and this is our way to show them that we appreciate what they do.”

Long-term care homes, hospitals and OPP detachments were among the stops the Shriners made. When the Shriners pulled up to each stop there was music playing from their float.

Lisa Mills, the life enrichment co-ordinator and environmental services manager at Kentwood Park, says that while the pandemic has presented challenges for all of us, having a group like the Shriners stop by to thank workers and send their best wishes makes a difference.

The Shriners’ visit was well-received by everyone at Kentwood Park, Lisa adds.

“That made everyone feel good; it was really nice of them to do that,” she tells The OMNIway.

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Forest Hill’s patio is getting lots of good use

Residents have been enjoying safe outdoor activities, entertainment and family visits

With restrictions in place on indoor group programming and visitation due to the global COVID-19 pandemic, Forest Hill has been making the most of its patio area to keep safe activities and socialization a part of everyday life at the Kanata, Ont. long-term care home.

When possible, life enrichment team members have been hosting programs, limited to 10 or fewer residents, on the patio (social distancing practices are always in place). Activities like trivia have been especially popular outdoors, says life enrichment co-ordinator Craig Forrest.

“We’re definitely trying to take advantage of (the outdoors) as much as we can,” Craig says. “We will also take residents outside on a one-to-one basis to the patio as well.”

There has also been outdoor entertainment at Forest Hill in recent weeks, with musical acts performing from a safe distance and residents seated apart. Because of the smaller audiences when entertainers perform, residents attend performances on a rotating basis.

In fact, Craig says there has been an added benefit to playing shows outside: better acoustics.

“We have always had lots of entertainment here, but it’s almost a different feeling outdoors – it almost sounds like a concert in a way,” he says.

“The residents have really enjoyed the outdoor entertainment because it almost feels like a festival.”

Because this summer has been warmer and sunnier than most, staff members have been stepping up hydration by ensuring residents always have cold drinks when they need them and, of course, providing sunscreen and hats to protect everyone from the rays.

Patio visits between residents and their loved ones have also spiked in recent weeks, Craig says. Forest Hill is offering these visits from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., seven days a week.

Family members who visit residents at the home’s patio are screened first.

“(Patio) visits have absolutely gone through the roof in popularity,” Craig says.

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New Facebook page is keeping Streamway Villa family members engaged

Life enrichment team members update the private page regularly with photos and videos of residents enjoying life at the Cobourg LTC home

Streamway Villa is using Facebook to keep residents’ family members updated regularly on the activities and programs their loved ones are participating in at the Cobourg, Ont. long-term care home.

Knowing residents’ families are interested in the activities their loved ones participate in, life enrichment co-ordinator Laurie Kracht and life enrichment aide Chelsea Tinney created the page, which they administer and is only seen by residents’ families and powers of attorney, to fill this need.

Laurie and Chelsea upload photos and videos of socially-distanced activities and of the residents themselves to keep families up to date during the global COVID-19 pandemic.

Family engagement on the Facebook page has been strong, Laurie says, adding family members often provide content to share.

“Families have started sending us pictures through Facebook Messenger, and we started posting those, and we’re getting e-mails left, right and centre (from family members) saying they love the page,” she tells The OMNIway.

“I’ve had comments from family members saying (the Facebook page) makes them feel like they’re there and they know what’s going on.”

Aside from being a conduit for family members to see what’s going on at Streamway Villa, the Facebook page is also a way for them to engage with each other, Laurie says.

“It’s turning out amazing,” she says.

“(The Facebook page) keeps the family members involved in the home, and we tell them about upcoming events and things like that, and if they have anything they want to post they can do so on the Facebook page.”

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Kentwood Park residents are turning to YouTube for much-loved drumming circle program

The program, which is normally led at the home by Ruth Dwight, is a resident favourite

For two years, Ruth Dwight has led a much-loved drumming circle program at Kentwood Park, but since she cannot enter the long-term care homes she works with because of restrictions in place due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Ruth is bringing the program to the Prince Edward County Public Library’s YouTube channel.

Long-term-care home residents – or anyone else interested in learning drumming techniques – can now follow Ruth while watching from their computer.

As part of the program Ruth leads at Kentwood Park and other long-term care homes in Prince Edward County, residents have a chance to experiment with a variety of percussion instruments, from hand-held drums to bongos.

But since she cannot visit Kentwood Park at the moment, Ruth has crafted drums out of coffee cans for residents to use. She’s also made drumsticks by adding sponge balls to the ends of wooden dowels.

Ruth has also taken plastic hollow Easter eggs and filled them with popcorn kernels to fashion an instrument that creates a sound similar to maracas.

Residents have been following Ruth’s videos since August and drumming along to her rhythms. They’ve been watching Ruth on Kentwood Park’s large TV and through an iPad outdoors when the weather has permitted.

Since the pandemic was declared by the World Health Organization in March, Kentwood Park and other long-term care homes have been restricted from having large-group indoor programming, and regular entertainers have not been able to perform indoors.

The videos of Ruth leading drumming programs are filling a much-needed gap for Kentwood Park residents, says Lisa Mills, the home’s life enrichment co-ordinator.

“She’s just amazing; the residents just love this, I mean, if you want to talk about being engaged, this has been a really big thing,” Lisa says.

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Adapting activities, thinking creatively, has helped Forest Hill deliver programming

Life enrichment team has stepped up to the challenge, says LEC

With safety protocols in place to keep residents and staff members safe during the ongoing global COVID-19 pandemic, the life enrichment team at Forest Hill has had to adapt activities and think outside the box in order to continue delivering high-quality programming.

The Kanata, Ont. long-term care home has 156 residents, making it one of the largest OMNI Health Care homes. While having a large resident population means there is more work to do, the life enrichment team has successfully stepped up to the challenge, says Forest Hill life enrichment co-ordinator (LEC) Craig Forrest.

After the World Health Organization declared the pandemic in March, Forest Hill, like OMNI’s other 17 long-term care homes, began organizing video chats between residents and their loved ones using Skype and FaceTime, which took a lot of planning and time, Craig says.

Now that some restrictions on visitation have been eased, team members’ days largely focus now on planning and overseeing visits inside and outside the home, he adds.

On top of this, some small-group programs, such as bingo and crafts, are running again with social distancing in effect, so staff members are also having to organize a rotation for residents to ensure that anyone wishing to participate gets a chance.

“Overall, we try to be as fair as we can by rotating the residents for programs, and that’s one way everyone has had to adapt,” Craig tells The OMNIway.

“We also have to adapt what was once a large program into a small program with social distancing.”

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Frost Manor becomes a ‘big-top tent’ in August

The ongoing pandemic has meant team members have had to tap into their creativity to develop fun, yet safe, activities for residents

Frost Manor has been transformed into a “big-top tent” throughout August and residents of the Lindsay, Ont. long-term care home could not be happier.

The life enrichment team has decorated the main lounge and small dining room to look like a carnival. Staff members have decorated the walls with images of a ferris wheel, roller coasters and a merry-go-round.

“We have tried to make it look like a carnival in here,” life enrichment co-ordinator Lyndsay Burton says.

Every year the Frost Manor life enrichment team treats residents to a month-long themed event that embraces the OMNI Health Care core value of fun and laughter.

This year the life enrichment team elected to create a carnival atmosphere throughout August that includes a variety of activities the team has developed to engage residents.

There have been many games and events the team has created that have a carnival theme, and prizes – such as chocolate bars or Cheezies – have been a favourite part of the events for residents, Lyndsay says.

“For the whole month we’ve tried to gear towards having a lot of prizes for the residents to win, and after they win a prize the residents get to spin a prize wheel which will determine the prize they receive,” Lyndsay explains.

Lyndsay says creating the carnival-themed month has been a learning curve for the life enrichment team because of protocols in place due to the global COVID-19 pandemic, but everyone has adapted well.

She adds that the pandemic has also resulted in the team having to think outside the box in order to create meaningful, fun, yet safe, activities for residents.

“COVID has put a bit of a damper on entertainment, so we have really tried to pull together our creative side and make sure that they’re still able to have fun and exciting programs for the summer,” Lyndsay says.

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Safe barbecues help bring some normalcy back to Willows residents

With social distancing in effect, recent small-group barbecues have helped residents enjoy a favourite summertime activity while keeping safe during the pandemic

Summer is here and that can only mean one thing: it’s barbecue season at Willows Estate.

Recently, the Aurora, Ont. long-term care home hosted back-to-back barbecues in the garden for residents.

The barbecues were on back-to-back days because large-group activities are still suspended in long-term care homes due to the ongoing global COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing protocols remain in effect.

Team members grilled hot dogs for residents and provided toppings, including mustard, relish, ketchup, mayonnaise, onion and tomato.

Residents were treated to cool beverages, such as orange juice, lemonade, fruit punch and water.

To complement the food, warm weather and atmosphere, life enrichment aide Azaria Kanda played jazz music in the background which residents enjoyed.

“(Residents) were, as usual, grateful to be back to somewhat normalcy for the time being and just enjoying the moment with friends from different floors they might have not seen in months,” Azaria tells The OMNIway.

“All in all, it was a wonderful time.”

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