Posts

‘Community changes everything’ at the core of Alzheimer Society’s 2022 awareness campaign

‘The First Link campaign emphasizes the themes of support, community and knowledge – all positive themes that intend to reassure people who are facing the frustrating question: What do I do next?’

The Alzheimer Society of Canada has launched its annual awareness campaign, and the main message the organization is focusing on in 2022 is “community changes everything,” say two of the society’s representatives.

At the heart of this message is First Link, an initiative the Alzheimer Society has created nationwide to help connect people living with dementia and their caregivers with programs and supports they need, say the Alzheimer Society’s chief of research and knowledge translation Dr. Saskia Sivananthan and marketing manager Nathan Christie.

In an e-mail interview with The OMNIway, Sivananthan and Christie say research conducted by the society’s COVID-19 and dementia task force indicates that people living with dementia and their caregivers have been disproportionately negatively impacted by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, so the theme for this year’s campaign is significant.

“As such, when developing this year’s campaign, the Alzheimer Society knew we had to focus on hope,” Sivananthan and Christie say in an e-mail.

“The First Link campaign emphasizes the themes of support, community and knowledge – all positive themes that intend to reassure people who are facing the frustrating question: What do I do next?

“Through the campaign, the Alzheimer Society wants people affected by dementia to know: you are not alone. There is support available right now.”

Sivananthan and Christie say the campaign, which has been launched to coincide with January being National Alzheimer’s Awareness Month, is particularly aimed at people who have Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia but are not connected with the Alzheimer Society.

This includes people recently diagnosed with dementia, people who know someone exhibiting signs of dementia and people with dementia living in communities the Alzheimer Society has not effectively reached.

The campaign is also aimed at health-care providers who can use First Link as a referral service for people living with dementia to help connect them to services and supports they need.

Sivananthan and Christie say the best result that could stem from this year’s awareness campaign would be to have more people living with dementia connected to their local Alzheimer Society through the First Link initiative.

“At its essence, this campaign wants to improve the quality of life for people living with dementia during a time where every aspect of life has gotten more difficult via the pandemic,” they say.

For more information on First Link, please contact the Alzheimer Society at 1-855-705-4636 (INFO) or info(at)alzheimer.ca.

– This is Part 1 of a two-part series

If you have a story you would like to share with The OMNIway, please contact the newsroom at deron(at)axiomnews.com.

If you have feedback on this story, please contact the newsroom at deron(at)axiomnews.com.

New Charter of Rights for People with Dementia can be used to complement existing Bill of Rights in LTC homes

Mary Schulz, the Alzheimer Society of Canada’s director of education.

Understanding the new charter can help LTC homes enhance quality of life for people with dementia, says the Alzheimer Society’s Mary Schulz

While Ontario long-term-care home residents have a Bill of Rights, the Alzheimer Society of Canada has launched the Charter of Rights for People with Dementia which was created by an advisory group of people with dementia. The charter can be used by homes to complement the existing rights residents have while creating an understanding of the “unique rights” of persons with dementia, says Mary Schulz. Read more

People living with dementia have created the first-ever Canadian Charter of Rights for People with Dementia

Mary Schulz, the Alzheimer Society of Canada’s director of education.

Alzheimer Society of Canada has launched the charter to raise awareness surrounding the unique rights people with dementia have

The Alzheimer Society of Canada today (Sept. 5) launched the Canadian Charter of Rights for People with Dementia, a first-of-its-kind framework outlining the rights people with dementia have. The charter was created by an advisory board of people living with dementia. Read more

Door murals adding to community feel at Garden Terrace while guiding residents to their rooms

Hallway has ‘become a vibrant neighbourhood with residents living behind their unique front door’

The OMNIway recently told you about how murals of bookshelves painted on three doors at Garden Terrace have helped reduce exit-seeking behaviours and agitation in residents with cognitive impairment. Today’s story is about how murals on doors are also helping residents find their way at the Ottawa-area long-term care home. Read more

Diversion doors are preventing exit-seeking behaviours at Garden Terrace

Bookshelf murals on 3 doors are having a positive impact, say staff and families

Since three “diversion doors” were painted at Garden Terrace 16 months ago, agitation caused by exit-seeking has been reduced in residents with cognitive impairment who are living at the Ottawa-area long-term care home, say staff members. Read more

LTC homes have role to play to help end stigma surrounding dementia: Alzheimer Society

Alzheimer Society director of education Mary Schulz

Encouraging friendships between residents with and without dementia is an important step, says Alzheimer Society education director Mary Schulz

The Alzheimer Society of Canada’s 2018 awareness campaign is focused on ending the stigma surrounding dementia, and the organization’s director of education says long-term care homes have a role to play in achieving this goal. Read more

Time is now to end dementia’s stigma: Alzheimer Society

Survey shows negative – and false – stereotypes of condition are prevalent in Canada

Results of a recent survey from the Alzheimer Society of Canada indicate a significant number of Canadians are concerned they would face discrimination or even be avoided by family if they had Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. Read more

Making the shift from ‘me’ to ‘we’ when caring for people with Alzheimer’s

Blogger shares how changing language enhances quality of life

Caring for a person living with cognitive impairment requires caregivers to be selective about the words they use, and substituting the words “you” and “me” with “we” is one important step in this process, says Alzheimer’s expert and blogger Bob DeMarco. Read more

Editorial: Canada’s new dementia strategy creates opportunity for LTC sector

With the passing of Bill C-233 in June, Canada became the 30th country to launch a national dementia strategy. This, of course, is welcomed news for people living with dementia and their families as well as for the long-term care sector. Read more

‘Positive language’ helps increase quality of life for people with dementia, say experts

Authors note changing language is an important part of Montessori methodology

Using positive language when working with people living with dementia is an important step in enhancing quality of life, say two authors of a book examining the positive impact of Montessori methodology on people who have cognitive impairment. Read more