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Streamway Villa helping other LTC homes implement BSO interventions

With BSO embedded in Streamway’s culture, team members are positioned to help others

Since implementing the Behavioural Supports Ontario (BSO) initiative in 2012, Streamway Villa has had many successes improving the quality of life for residents with responsive behaviours. Read more

Enhancing quality of life is a team effort, Streamway Villa case study demonstrates

Streamway Villa BSO-RPN Sarah Wilson (left) is seen here holding the Elisabeth Hinton Memorial Award, alongside the home’s administrator and DOC Kylie Szczebonski in June. Sarah presented a case study on

Streamway Villa BSO-RPN Sarah Wilson (left) is seen here holding her Elisabeth Hinton Memorial Award, alongside the home’s administrator and DOC Kylie Szczebonski, in June. Sarah presented a case study on managing end-stage dementia and irreversible delirium during an Oct. 27 Central East LHIN BSO meeting.

Streamway BSO-RPN and NP present success story during Central East BSO meeting

Streamway Villa RPN-BSO Sarah Wilson and nurse practitioner (NP) Dmitri Goold presented a case study Oct. 27 focused on managing end-stage dementia and irreversible delirium during a Central East Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) Behavioural Supports Ontario (BSO) meeting on Oct. 27. Read more

Riverview RPN-BSO says best part of her work is enhancing residents’ quality of life

Vanessa Soto-Ward, pictured at right with BSO lead Becky Dennie, has been an RPN-BSO at Riverview Manor since July. Vanessa has worked at the Peterborough long-term care home since 2013. She says her previous experience working with residents has been an asset to her new role.

Vanessa Soto-Ward, pictured at right with BSO lead Becky Dennie, has been an RPN-BSO at Riverview Manor since July. Vanessa has worked at the Peterborough long-term care home since 2013. She says her previous experience working with residents has been an asset to her new role.

‘To see that change and to see them smiling is really nice,’ says Vanessa Soto-Ward

PETERBOROUGH, Ont. – Vanessa Soto-Ward says her favourite part of her job as a registered practical nurse (RPN) for Riverview Manor’s Behavioural Supports Ontario (BSO) program is seeing the difference team members make when they enhance residents’ quality of life. Read more

Living OMNI’s values earns Logan Burrows an Everyday Hero Award

Riverview Manor PSW Logan Burrows (right) is seen here accepting the Peterborough long-term care home's Everyday Hero Award from OMNI president and CEO Patrick McCarthy on June 10.

Riverview Manor PSW Logan Burrows (right) is seen here accepting the Peterborough long-term care home’s Everyday Hero Award from OMNI president and CEO Patrick McCarthy on June 10.

PSW has also been a champion at making Riverview Manor’s BSO program successful

PETERBOROUGH, Ont. – Logan Burrows is always living OMNI Health Care’s values and is a resident-focused personal support worker (PSW) who enhances quality of life for the 124 people living at Riverview Manor, say her co-workers. It’s these attributes that earned her an Everyday Hero Award. Read more

Sarah Wilson receives Elisabeth Hinton Award for work enhancing residents’ quality of life

Streamway Villa BSO-RPN Sarah Wilson (left) is seen here holding the Elisabeth Hinton Memorial Award, alongside the home’s administrator and DOC Kylie Szczebonski. Wilson received the award at a June 9 ceremony at the Cobourg long-term care home.

Streamway Villa BSO-RPN Sarah Wilson (left) is seen here holding the Elisabeth Hinton Memorial Award, alongside the home’s administrator and DOC Kylie Szczebonski. Wilson received the award at a June 9 ceremony at the Cobourg long-term care home.

BSO-RPN ‘goes above and beyond the call of duty for OMNI, Streamway Villa and the residents’

COBOURG, Ont. – Streamway Villa Behavioural Supports Ontario registered practical nurse (BSO-RPN) specialist Sarah Wilson is the recipient of the 2016 Elisabeth Hinton Memorial Award.

The award was presented to Wilson during a ceremony at the Cobourg long-term care home June 9.

Wilson began her career at Streamway Villa in 2011, shortly after completing her nursing education. When Streamway Villa received funding for BSO education through the Central East Local Health Integration Network (LHIN), Wilson was “eager” to pursue an opportunity to learn about BSO and apply its techniques at the home, says Aimee Merkley, OMNI Health Care’s western director of operations.

BSO is a provincial initiative to help enhance quality of life for seniors affected by dementia and other conditions that cause agitation. The funding, which is provided to long-term care homes through Ontario’s14 LHINs, is largely put towards staff education.

A highlight of Wilson’s career has been her work to reduce antipsychotic medication administration to residents with responsive behaviours. After Wilson and administrator Kylie Szczebonski assessed antipsychotic usage at Streamway Villa in 2011, Wilson, by applying her BSO knowledge, helped reduce antipsychotic administration from 55 per cent to one per cent.

“Her dedicated work has put Streamway Villa on the map in the Central East LHIN as a (long-term care home) that manages responsive behaviours very well,” Merkley says.

“Her research and persistent conversations with families and physicians made this project successful.”

Additionally, Wilson has shared knowledge from her BSO training with her colleagues at Streamway Villa and with other long-term care homes in the region.

The Elisabeth Hinton Memorial Award is presented to a registered nurse or registered practical nurse working in an OMNI long-term care home who demonstrates excellence in nursing and exhibits kindness and caring in everything he or she does.

The award is named after Elisabeth Hinton, the first director of nursing at Garden Terrace, an OMNI long-term care home in Kanata. A highly skilled, patient and calm nurse leader who carried herself with tremendous class and professionalism, Hinton passed away in 2007.

“Sarah deserves this award because she represents what Elisabeth Hinton was,” Merkley says. “The nursing managers nominated Sarah for the Elisabeth Hinton Memorial Award because she goes above and beyond the call of duty for OMNI, Streamway Villa and the residents.”

Looking ahead, Wilson says she plans to continue training others in the methodologies she has learned, such as the Gentle Persuasive Approach and P.I.E.C.E.S. (physical, intellectual, emotional, capabilities, environment and social). While happy to receive the Elisabeth Hinton Memorial Award, Wilson says she was surprised by the honour.

“This is absolutely incredible and emotionally overwhelming,” she says.

If you have a story you would like to share with The OMNIway, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.com.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.com.

BSO knowledge sharing attributed to low resident agitation at Pleasant Meadow

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‘When we find something that works, we just make sure that it keeps getting passed on’

When Pleasant Meadow Manor staff members attend Behavioural Supports Ontario (BSO) educational sessions they always return with knowledge they can bring back to their colleagues, says Chris Garden. Read more

Burnbrae working to strengthen BSO team

Burnbrae Gardens

Burnbrae Gardens

‘Excited’ interdepartmental team attends workshop

A group of team members from Burnbrae Gardens recently attended a Behavioural Supports Ontario (BSO) workshop to support the home’s BSO team development. Read more

OMNI applauds province for additional LTC funding in 2016-17 budget

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Gov’t promises 2% increase in level-of-care funding, $10M annual injection for BSO over next 3 years

OMNI Health Care is applauding the province for its 2016-17 budget announcement that includes a level-of-care funding increase and a multimillion-dollar injection into the Behavioural Supports Ontario (BSO) program. Read more

Addressing care needs key to preventing LTC violence: McCarthy

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Continuing programs like BSO, rather than increased staff levels, a more effective use of funding

Friday, March 28, 2014 — Deron Hamel

OMNI Health Care is supportive of more funding directed at resources that help address and prevent resident violence in long-term care homes, as opposed to increasing staffing levels to allow for more resident monitoring.

Research from the Ontario Long Term Care Association suggests there are increasing numbers of residents living with dementia as well as residents exhibiting aggressive behaviours in the province’s 628 long-term care homes.

While some labour groups and stakeholders in the sector are calling for minimum staffing levels, OMNI president and CEO Patrick McCarthy says that investment in staffing resources is needed, but in a way that better meets the needs of residents and families.  Continued investment in training and resources, such as Behavioural Supports Ontario (BSO), with staff deployment in each home is a more effective use of funding.

McCarthy says he also supports greater recognition of the particular needs of small homes, and better methods of allocating funding resources than currently exists.

BSO is a provincial initiative that’s enhancing quality of life for seniors affected by dementia and other conditions that can cause agitation, and McCarthy says this is an example of a program that’s key to addressing the issue of resident violence.

BSO funding, which is provided to long-term care homes through the province’s 14 Local Health Integration Networks, is largely put towards staff education.

“Our solutions (to preventing resident aggression) are more focused on resident care needs, (such as) investing in BSO, staffing at every home, increased funding resources, better measure care requirements, less administrative burden, and support (for) small homes,” McCarthy tells the OMNIway.

When long-term care home staff members learn about preventing violence and how to better work with residents who have a cognitive impairment the outcome is reduced aggression and a higher quality of life for people, OMNI has found through BSO interventions.

For example, in its first year of involvement with BSO in 2012, Riverview Manor saw a 35.5 per cent decline in responsive agitation, while the rate of PRN(pharmaceuticals given on an as-needed basis) medication administration dropped 34.4 per cent.

Likewise, Streamway Villa has reported a large reduction in incidents of responsive behaviours, such as aggression, wandering, physical resistance and agitation, after team members began applying their BSO learnings.

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or email deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.