Riverview LEA is making residents hysterical

Riverview Manor resident Aileen Bailey is seen here with LEA Adam Wicklum during a laughter yoga session.

Riverview Manor resident Aileen Bailey is seen here with LEA Adam Wicklum during a laughter yoga session.

Adam Wicklum’s laughter yoga program providing many benefits to residents

Friday, July 25, 2014 — Deron Hamel

Laughter, it has been said, is the best medicine, and if that’s the case Adam Wicklum has the cure for what ails you.

For the past two months, the life enrichment aide (LEA) at Riverview Manor has been leading a biweekly laughter yoga program at the Peterborough long-term care home. Residents look forward to the activity and participation has brightened spirits and put smiles on faces, Wicklum says.

The idea behind laughter yoga is simple: voluntary laughter has the same benefits as regular laughter in the sense that both provide a myriad of benefits. Often, the process of forcing laughter turns into regular, spontaneous laughter.

Wicklum, who has completed training in laughter yoga, says the program provides social, mental, physical, emotional and even spiritual benefits.

“Research has found that as we get older we laugh less, but laughter yoga allows you to laugh for no reason,” Wicklum says, noting the reasons why laughter is important.

“Laughter yoga promotes a positive mental state, increases oxygen supply, builds physical stamina, boosts immune systems, (creates) social connectedness , improves circulation reduces pain, helps people relax and is fun.”

There are several steps to laughter yoga. These include clapping, chanting, deep-breathing exercises and “happy-face” breathing (called so because participants draw a happy face in the air). After these steps, Wicklum leads residents in the process of getting people to laugh.

Different types of laughter are also encouraged — everything from a hearty, ho, ho, ho, to mimicking the chuckle of people’s favourite fictional villain, such as a witch, Count Dracula or the Joker from Batman.

Sometimes, Wicklum leads residents in a “laughter choir” where they are instructed to laugh at different pitches and lengths to produce a long, conducive chuckle — such as “ho, ha, hee.”

Wicklum says resident response to the program has been encouraging.

“Last week I had a resident who didn’t want to go, but then changed her mind and when it was done, she said she really liked it and felt uplifted, so that was great to hear,” he says.

When Wicklum leads the program every other Wednesday he tries to mix up the atmosphere. Sometimes the program is held in the activity room, but if the weather is nice he and the approximately 20 resident participants will go outside.

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

Car show delivers smiles to residents once again

Riverview Manor resident Doris Shiniman is seen here with one of the many classic cars at the home July 22 during its annual car show.

Riverview Manor resident Doris Shiniman is seen here with one of the many classic cars at the home July 22 during its annual car show.

Annual tradition has become so popular with residents, car club now calls home to book dates

Thursday, July 24, 2014 — Deron Hamel

Riverview Manor residents were once again treated to a car show that has become an important part of the Peterborough long-term care home’s culture.

In fact, the relationship between Riverview Manor and the enthusiasts who form the seniors’ car club has become so strong over the years the club now calls the home to book dates to visit — not the other way around.

Each summer car club members take their wheels to Peterborough-area long-term care homes and invite residents and staff members to have a look. The car show always brings back lots of memories for residents who often reminisce for days afterwards about the experience, says life enrichment co-ordinator Sherry Baldwin.

The July 22 event, which included a barbecue, saw an array of classic cars on display in the home’s parking lot. Baldwin says about 50 of the home’s 124 residents came outside to have a look at the cars, which included hot rods dating back more than 80 years.

“We also had a deejay this year, which was great, so there was lots of music and it was a lot of fun,” Baldwin says.  “The cars were absolutely gorgeous and the residents loved it.”

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

Riverview salutes Inspired Leader, Everyday Hero

Pair honoured committed to professional growth: Greco

ORILLIA, Ont. – Becky Dennie has a thirst for knowledge. The long-standing Riverview Manor employee, who has developed and grown significantly in her career at the Peterborough long-term care home, recently earned Riverview Manor’s Inspired Leader award.

OMNI honoured staff members from its 18 long-term care homes May 7 during the second annual Awards and Recognition Night at Fern Resort.

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Riverview Manor team raises $5K at MS walk

Staff member living with MS commends co-workers, OMNI for support

PETERBOROUGH, Ont. – Pietra Lodewyks is commending the support she’s received from her colleagues at Riverview Manor and OMNI Health Care in raising about $5,000 for this year’s Peterborough Mandarin MS Walk.

For the second straight year, Lodewyks, who serves on the board of the MS Society of Canada’s Peterborough chapter, organized a team to represent Riverview Manor at the annual walk, which raises money for MS research and awareness of the neurological disease.

Lodewyks has a personal reason for her passion in finding a cure for multiple sclerosis — she was diagnosed with the disease in December 2009.

On the morning of May 25, Lodewyks and three of her colleagues from Riverview Manor gathered at the Trent Community Sports and Rec Centre for the walk around the facility’s outdoor track.

Since receiving her diagnosis, Lodewyks says OMNI has helped her through some challenging times. OMNI even had T-shirts made for the Riverview Manor team — and home office had them made with very short notice, Lodewyks notes.

“OMNI has been very good to me,” she says. “They have been very accommodating, and they still stick by me. I enjoy working there and OMNI has a lifetime employee in me.”

Lodewyks, a registered practical nurse at Riverview Manor, also has a lot of praise for her co-workers at the Peterborough long-term care home.

“I love them all; they’re a great bunch and I’m a very lucky girl to work with them,” she says.
 
Do you have a story you would like to share with The OMNIway? If so, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have any feedback on this story, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

Riverview Manor celebrates Nursing Week

The Riverview Manor team poses with a cake with the inscription "Happy Nursing Week" at a May 16 celebration of front-line staff.

The Riverview Manor team poses with a cake with the inscription “Happy Nursing Week” at a May 16 celebration of front-line staff.


Tuesday, May 20, 2014 — Deron Hamel

PETERBOROUGH, Ont. – Riverview Manor celebrated its nurses and personal support workers (PSWs) on Friday with a barbecue in honour of National Nursing Week, which ran May 12-18.

The May 16 event saw OMNI Health Care nutrition and food services manager Chris Weber stop by the Peterborough long-term care home to grill chicken, sausages and hamburgers for front-line staff. The day also saw an array of prize draws for gifts that were handed out to nurses and PSWs.

Home management also presented a cake with the inscription “Happy Nursing Week” to the team.

Held the week of nursing pioneer Florence Nightingale’s birthday on May 12 every year since 1965, National Nursing Week aims to celebrate and acknowledge the contributions nurses make to Canada’s health-care system.

Video to come soon.

BSO helping Riverview keep antipsychotic administration low

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Psychotropic medication usage 20% below provincial LTC home average

Tuesday, April 22, 2014 — Deron Hamel

PETERBOROUGH, Ont. – When front-line staff members approach a Riverview Manor resident who has advanced dementia to provide her care needs, the resident often prefers to be left alone. So that’s just what staff members do.

They will approach the resident later, and if the women still does not want her care needs implemented, staff will again leave her. Only when the resident says it’s OK will staff members provide her care needs.

This is one example of how the Peterborough long-term care home’s number of residents on antipsychotic medications is only 12.28 per cent, well below the provincial average of 31.5 per cent.

While the resident does exhibit behaviours, this simple approach of giving her the space she needs ensures that medication doesn’t need to be administered.

Riverview Manor is involved with the province’s Behavioural Supports Ontario (BSO) initiative. BSO is a $40-million provincial initiative to enhance quality of life for seniors affected by dementia and other conditions causing agitation.

Through funding allocated through the Central East Local Health Integration Network, Riverview Manor staff members have accessed education and training in BSO interventions. The home has a “BSO team” of staff members trained in these interventions, which include Montessori techniques and gentle persuasive approaches (GPA). The team is called in to help personal support workers when they are caring for this resident, should the need arise.

Staff members have even taken time to learn simple phrases in the resident’s native language to make her feel more at ease.

With interventions like these, the resident doesn’t exhibit behaviours, eliminating the need for psychotropic medications, explains administrator Mary Anne Greco.

“At Riverview, our philosophy of the utilization of medication, especially for any antipsychotic medications, is that it’s used very wisely and very judiciously,” she says. “We try that really as a last resort.

“We monitor (residents on antipsychotic medications) to make sure they’re not having any adverse side effects to the medication, we liaise with the family to see how they are doing and we’re always incorporating our Behavioural Supports Ontario team to assist with that so that all the staff are aware of the (best) approaches for residents so we don’t have to be looking at medication as a first line of care.”

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.
 
If you have feedback on this story, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

VIDEO: Antipsychotic medication: the exception, not the rule

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Thursday, April 17, 2014 — Deron Hamel

Riverview Manor has firm policy surrounding the administration of antipsychotic medication to residents affected by dementia. These medications are used sparingly and only as a last resort when other non-medical interventions have not helped calm a person who is exhibiting aggressive behaviour.

In fact, only 12.28 per cent of residents are on antipsychotic medications at the Peterborough long-term care home. This is well below the provincial average of 31.5 per cent.

A recent article in the Toronto Star accuses Ontario long-term care homes of “drugging helpless seniors at an alarming rate with powerful antipsychotic drugs.” Not only is this not the case at Riverview Manor, but stories like this are detrimental to the entire long-term care sector. Riverview Manor staff members explain in this video.

Riverview breakfast program is getting people talking

Anita Kossmann is seen here enjoying pancakes during Riverview Manor's recent ladies' breakfast club.

Anita Kossmann is seen here enjoying pancakes during Riverview Manor’s recent ladies’ breakfast club.


Great food and conversations mark ladies’ club

Tuesday, March 4, 2014 — Deron Hamel

Anita Kossmann was in a chatty mood, meeting new people over pancakes, blueberries and peameal bacon last Friday during Riverview Manor’s ladies’ breakfast club.

Anita is usually the strong silent type, says life enrichment co-ordinator Sherry Baldwin, but the atmosphere created by the Peterborough long-term care home’s staff members was the perfect environment for lots of conversations and socialization.

Anita, who lives in the south end of the home was sitting with other residents she didn’t know before who live in the north end. Almost immediately conversations began to flow as new friendships were made.

And, of course, there was the delicious food prepared by the dietary staff which provides a spark for excellent conversation, says Baldwin. Anita and the other residents, she notes, ate well.

“Anita blew us away by eating as much as she did and chatting as much as she did and really enjoying herself,” Baldwin says. “These were ladies who hadn’t been to (the breakfast program) in awhile.”

Baldwin says she and other staff members try to get as many residents out to the monthly program as possible. There’s a breakfast club for women and another for men.

Working together, the life enrichment and dietary departments make the program as inclusive as possible. All residents are encouraged to attend and special dietary needs will be met.

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

Staff raise funds for animals through sweets

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Riverview Manor supports local Humane Society with cupcake sale

Wednesday, February 12, 2014 — Jennifer Neutel

Two Riverview Manor staff members are leading a fundraising effort starting today to support the Peterborough Humane Society.

Dana Huggins, environmental service worker, and personal support worker Laura Knox, are organizing a cupcake sale that starts today (Feb. 12) at the Peterborough long-term care home. Staff, family members and residents (non-diabetic) can pay a minimum of one dollar for a cupcake, with funds going towards the humane society.

The cupcakes will be on sale daily until Feb. 23.

Staff and family members are also invited to bring in wet or dry pet food, as well as towels or comforters for bedding, throughout the month.

“We are just trying to raise money for a good cause because we have a lot of animal lovers here,” says Huggins.

Life enrichment co-ordinator Sonia Murney notes she found out during morning report that staff members in the home’s environmental department collected money for the humane society at Christmas instead of giving each other gifts.

“I thought that is just wonderful,” adds Murney, who says she will “absolutely” be purchasing a cupcake.

Murney says it is always good for the home to be involved with the community, and pet therapy is a big program at the home.

“The residents love the animals, so I think that goes hand in hand with (this fundraiser),” she adds.

The Peterborough Humane Society is promoting National Cupcake Day on Feb. 24. Huggins found out about the national day when she dropped off the Christmas donation, which prompted the idea for the home’s bake sale.

Huggins, Knox and a few other staff members are making the cupcakes for the sale.

According to its website, the Peterborough Humane Society “advocates for the welfare of animals by improving their lives, alleviating suffering, rescuing, providing shelter, healing, facilitating adoption and reducing pet overpopulation.”

The registered charitable organization was established in 1941.

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 26, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 26, or e-mail jennifer(at)axiomnews.ca.

Riverview Manor helps community with toy drive

Peterborough home collects two boxes of toys

Wednesday, December 18, 2013 — Deron Hamel

Riverview Manor has been demonstrating the Christmas spirit this holiday season through its involvement with a Peterborough radio station’s annual toy drive to benefit children in low-income families.

This year the home’s staff members and families donated enough toys to fill two medium-sized boxes with stuffed animals and other Christmas favourites for the Salvation Army’s annual Christmas appeal.

Local radio station Country 105 FM/Energy 99.7 FM spearheads a toy drive for the charity called the Magic Broadcast. The City of Peterborough also helps out by donating a bus with a volunteer driver to stop at various drop-off points in Peterborough to collect toys for the Salvation Army.

Staff members from Peterborough’s Country 105 FM/Energy 99.7 FM are seen here picking up toys during the Miracle Broadcast Dec. 14.

Staff members from Peterborough’s Country 105 FM/Energy 99.7 FM are seen here picking up toys during the Miracle Broadcast Dec. 14.

As part of the Miracle Broadcast, collected toys are brought to Lansdowne Place shopping centre.

As with previous years, Riverview Manor was a drop-off point this holiday season, and on Saturday the Miracle Broadcast bus swung by the home to fetch the donated toys.

Riverview Manor personal support worker (PSW) Virginia Gall, whose husband, George Gall, is news director at Country 105, was involved with the Riverview Manor toy drive.

Virginia decorated the donation boxes and got posters from the radio station advertising the event at the home.

Based on the success of the drive’s repeated success throughout the years, Virginia says the event will likely continue to be a fixture at Riverview Manor in the future.

“I think everybody really enjoys donating to such a great cause,” the PSW tells the OMNIway.

In addition to the toy drive, Riverview Manor is hosting a food drive for the Peterborough Food Bank this holiday season. To date, two bins have been filled with non-perishable food.

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or email deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.