Pleasant Meadow applauds province’s investment in LTC nurse practitioners

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Home knows first-hand of benefits to LTC homes and hospitals

Thursday, March 6, 2014 — Deron Hamel

Pleasant Meadow Manor nursing administrative services manager Susan Towns is applauding the Ontario government’s recent announcement to invest in 75 nurse practitioners during the next three years who will tend to the needs of long-term care home residents.

Towns says the province’s decision will be beneficial to long-term care residents because more nurse practitioners means fewer home-to-hospital transfers, which can have a negative impact on those living in long-term care homes.

“I think it’s absolutely wonderful that they’re going to increase the number of nurse practitioners available to (long-term care homes),” Towns tells the OMNIway. “(Nurse practitioners) have been an absolute asset to our home.”

Nurse practitioners visit long-term care homes to provide on-site care for medical issues that front-line staff members are unable to treat. They can also prescribe some medications. For example, nurse practitioners can order antibiotics for infections. This, says Towns, is beneficial on two levels.

Firstly, residents needing additional treatment can remain at their long-term care homes, rather than having to deal with the stress of a hospital transfer. When a resident goes to hospital from a long-term care home it can create a lot of anxiety and worsen a person’s quality of life, especially if they end up waiting a long time to be seen, she says.

Secondly, because residents are able to remain at the home, there’s less emergency-room congestion, an issue facing the acute-care system.

Since 2010, a nurse practitioner has been regularly visiting Pleasant Meadow Manor as part of its involvement with the Central East Local Health Integration Network’s (LHIN’s) Nurse Practitioners Supporting Teams Averting Transfers (NPSTAT) program. Since then, Towns says many of the Norwood long-term care home’s residents have been able to avoid hospital transfers.

As part of the funding, long-term care homes that successfully apply for nurse practitioner funding but are unable to recruit one will be able to access the province’s new Grow Your Own Nurse Practitioner in Long-Term Care program. Once launched in 2015-16, this initiative will support homes in providing registered nurses with the education and training to become nurse practitioners.

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

Pleasant Meadow cheers on as Canadian women take gold

People at Pleasant Meadow Manor are seen here celebrating after the Canadian women won gold in hockey.

People at Pleasant Meadow Manor are seen here celebrating after the Canadian women won gold in hockey.

Home making the most of a big day for Canada at Winter Games

Friday, February 21, 2014 — Deron Hamel

It was all hoots and hollers at Pleasant Meadow Manor on Thursday afternoon as residents and staff members watched Team Canada beat Team USA 3-2 to win the gold medal for the fourth consecutive time in the Winter Olympics.

But the celebrations had actually started earlier in the day, when the Canadian women’s curling team took the gold medal in a match against Sweden.

Many of the Norwood long-term care home’s residents and staff members were decked out in red-and-white maple leaf shirts, hats and rub-on tattoos as they cheered the Canadian ladies to victory in hockey and curling.

Canadian flags adorned the home in celebration of the day. Some residents attached flags to their wheelchairs and walkers. During Thursday’s events, residents and staff members gathered around the TV, while others participated in activities, including a floor-hockey game.

It was a tight hockey game that ended in overtime when Marie-Philip Poulin scored to ensure Team Canada’s victory.

Residents had a blast, says life enrichment co-ordinator Chris Garden.

“They’re loving it; they think this is great,” she says. “They’ve been parading around the home with their little flags and all of them were cheering.”

The rivalry between Canadian and U.S. hockey isn’t over. Team Canada and Team USA face off today in the semifinal round of the men’s ice-hockey tournament. The winner will advance to the gold-medal match on Sunday.

And you can bet everyone at Pleasant Meadow Manor and OMNI Health Care’s other 17 long-term care homes will be watching.

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or email deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

Supportive Measures key to preventing unwanted advances: administrator

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Pleasant Meadow Manor would turn first to OMNI’s proven program

Wednesday, February 5, 2014 — Deron Hamel

Although Pleasant Meadow Manor has not had incidents of residents making unwanted sexual advances on other residents, administrator and director of care Sandra Tucker says staff members would look first to a tried and proven intervention — Supportive Measures — if they occurred.

A core OMNI Health Care program, Supportive Measures is aimed at developing an individualized approach to care. It also utilizes individual interventions to identify the causes of anxiety and agitation and enact processes to help residents feel calm and secure in their home.

Tucker says if an incident of unwanted sexual advances occurred at the Norwood long-term care home, a staff member would approach the resident making the advances and redirect them using tools from the Supportive Measures program.

For example, the staff member might approach the resident and start talking about a subject of interest to change their focus. Or a staff member might suggest the resident join them for a walk.

However, if a situation arose involving two consenting residents and there was no objection from the residents’ power of attorney (POA), Tucker says staff members would not interfere — after all, this is the residents’ home and they have the right to pursue relationships.

Tucker underscores that residents’ rights must remain top of mind.

“We work at the residents’ home; they don’t live at our work,” she says. “If there are two consenting adults wishing to have a relationship, who are we to interfere with that?”

If a POA objected to this — for example, if the incident involved a resident with a spouse living outside the home — staff members would accommodate the POA’s wishes.

The OMNIway is taking a closer look at sexuality and safety in long-term care. Through a series of stories, interviews and videos, Axiom News is exploring the rights, risks and regulations related to the issue of sexuality and safety.

Stay tuned to the OMNIway for stories unpacking these issues.

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

Pleasant Meadow flu-vaccination campaign rolling along

Most residents, staff members receive immunization

November 13, 2013 — Deron Hamel

Almost all of the 61 residents and about 80 per cent of staff members at Pleasant Meadow Manor have received the flu shot this year as

Getting the vaccination is especially important for residents 65 and older

Getting the vaccination is especially important for residents 65 and older. Creative Commons photo.

part of OMNI Health Care’s corporate-wide vaccination campaign.

Pleasant Meadow Manor registered nurse Shelley Vandenberg says all the residents who have consented to the vaccination have received the flu shot and the campaign is ongoing at the Norwood long-term care home.

Each year at this time OMNI Health Care’s 17 long-term care homes embark on the vaccination campaign as part of the effort to keep homes free of the flu. The program is important to any home’s infection prevention and control program and helps keep outbreaks ay bay, says Vandenberg.

“It’s not going to always stop people from getting sick, but (the vaccination) is going to make it less severe,” Vandenberg says.

Vandenberg says flu vaccinations are especially important for seniors living in long-term care homes.

“As with any medication there are pros and cons, but (with the flu vaccination) the pros far outweigh the cons as far as I’m concerned, especially for people who are vulnerable already,” the RN says.

The Health Canada website underscores the importance of influenza vaccinations and infection prevention.

“The most effective way to protect yourself from the flu is to be vaccinated each year in the fall,” the site says. “Regular hand-washing is another way to help minimize your risk. By washing your hands often, you will reduce your chance of becoming infected.”

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or email deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

Cruise night proves to be valuable fundraising, community engagement event

norwood_carshow

Pleasant Meadow Manor recently hosted a cruise night that saw 23 classic cars stop by the Norwood long-term care home.

Life enrichment worker’s first crack at event organizing pays off for Pleasant Meadow

October 1, 2013 — Deron Hamel

Life enrichment worker Tiffany Martell was recently at a car show and fundraiser in Warsaw, Ont., when she got an idea — why not do the same thing at Pleasant Meadow Manor?

She brought the idea to her manager, life enrichment co-ordinator (LEC) Chris Garden, who supported it, and on Sept. 18 the Norwood Cruisers brought 23 classic and antique cars and three motorcycles to the home for residents, their families, staff members and people from the community to enjoy.

The event, which Martell organized, was also used as a fundraiser for residents’ council. A barbecue, 50-50 draw and a silent auction raised a whopping $1,662 in just a few hours.

Garden attributes much of the event’s success to planning — and advertising. Her husband, who works as a mechanic in Norwood, spread the word to customers, and Martell created posters advertising the event. Even the local branch of the Royal Canadian Legion helped advertise the event, as did staff members, volunteers and families.

“The night was great; it was a huge success . . . and there was a great teamwork approach to make it happen,” Garden tells the OMNIway.

Garden also commends Martell for coming up with the idea and making it work.

“Tiffany did an awesome job,” says the LEC, adding it was Martell’s first time organizing a large event at the home.

Garden notes the event was successful in two ways. First, the money it raised for residents’ council will go towards meaningful programming. Secondly, there’s an important engagement aspect — the event brought Norwood residents to the home and proved itself once again to be a central spot in the community.

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051 or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

Fun and laughter complement new cruise experience

Six residents tour the Thousand Islands

The Pleasant Meadow Manor team changed things up for this year’s annual boat cruise last week by taking six residents to Gananoque to tour the Thousand Islands — a move that delighted those participants.

In past years the Norwood long-term care home took residents to Stony Lake for a boat cruise in summer. However, cruises at Stony Lake are unavailable this year, so the team decided to take residents more than two hours away to Gananoque, and both the cruise and the drive down presented opportunities for fun and laughter, says life enrichment co-ordinator Chris Garden.[wzslider info=”true”]

Garden packed a lunch of sandwiches, doughnuts and fruit for the six residents, four staff members and a volunteer who went on the cruise, which was a good time from start to finish, she says.

“We laughed and giggled all the way there on the long ride, and the residents enjoyed the boat cruise, even though it was a little overcast in some places,” Garden says.

Resident Helen Hogg, who has lived at Pleasant Meadow Manor since May, says it’s activities like the cruise that make life at the home special.

She says her favourite parts of the day were driving down to Gananoque in the OMNI van and seeing the boats on the water once they arrived at Lake Ontario.

“And it was a finger-licking good lunch,” Hogg laughs, adding this was her favourite outing to date.

Given that the group was not familiar with the trip between Norwood and Gananoque there was one small issue — they briefly got lost. But even that was fun for people, says Garden.

“We had a GPS, so we quickly found our way back to the correct route,” she chuckles.

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.