Lions Club brings smiles to Pleasant Meadow residents and staff

Members delivered Tim Hortons Smile Cookies to the home Sept. 14

Pleasant Meadow Manor residents and staff members were on the receiving end of a random act of kindness recently when members of the local chapter of the Lions Club dropped off some special cookies.

On Sept. 14, members of the Norwood Lions Club showed up with six boxes of Smile Cookies from Tim Hortons. Smile Cookies are chocolate chunk cookies adorned with smiley faces. They are the centrepiece of Tim Hortons’ annual Smile Cookie campaign.

Every year since 1996, Tim Hortons has run the Smile Cookie campaign. During the campaign, 100 per cent of the proceeds from the sale of Smile Cookies are donated to charities in communities across Canada.

Everyone at Pleasant Meadow Manor was surprised by the Smile Cookies, which were served to residents and staff members in the afternoon, says Kim Williams, Pleasant Meadow Manor’s life enrichment co-ordinator.

The kind gesture from the Lions Club is an example of a small thing that can make a big difference, Kim says.

“These are the types of surprises that everyone enjoys and puts smiles on everyone’s faces,” she tells The OMNIway.

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Pleasant Meadow residents gearing up for in-home baking contest

Residents and staff will compete for bragging rights at the home’s in-house fall fair

Pleasant Meadow Manor residents have been working hard on Saturdays to get ready for an upcoming baking contest at the Norwood, Ont. long-term care home that will see them compete against staff members for bragging rights.

Residents have been baking cookies, brownies, squares and cupcakes which are being stored in the home’s freezer until the second annual Pleasant Meadow Fall Fair on Oct. 12.

Pleasant Meadow held its own fall fair in 2020, due to the Norwood Fall Fair being cancelled to protect volunteers and attendees during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Norwood Fall Fair’s board of directors decided to cancel this year’s event as well, so Pleasant Meadow Manor will once again be hosting its own version of the event.

“We are doing baking groups on the weekend because the residents are going to be competing with the staff for the baking contest,” says Kim Williams, Pleasant Meadow’s life enrichment co-ordinator.

“We are starting to make our decorations and getting everything prepared.”

Before the pandemic, Pleasant Meadow residents and staff members would visit the Norwood Fall Fair annually and submit baked goods and crafts in contests the fair hosts.

Since attending the fair is so important to residents, the Pleasant Meadow Manor is keeping the tradition going in-house.

Last year a baking contest was held for staff members, with Jeanette Davis winning first place in all categories and named Pleasant Meadow Manor’s Baker of the Year.

The team wanted residents involved in this year’s contest, so they will be competing against staff members.

Kim says last year’s fall fair was a big hit with residents and she expects a repeat in 2021.

“It went really well and there was a lot of participation from both staff and residents,” she says.

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Craft helps residents express what they love most about themselves

An activity on Self-Awareness Saturday also helped Pleasant Meadow staff learn more about residents

Pleasant Meadow Manor residents recently enjoyed an activity where they had an opportunity to do some soul searching and discover the things they love most about themselves.

As part of the activity on Self-Awareness Saturday (Sept. 4), residents made paper cutouts of hearts with two arms on both sides. On the hearts, they wrote the things they love most about themselves.

The program was hosted by the Norwood, Ont. long-term care home’s life enrichment team members. Life enrichment staff visited residents in their rooms to make the hearts and help residents tap into their self-love, explains life enrichment co-ordinator Kim Williams.

Kim says aside from being an excellent way for residents to think about their favourite qualities, it was also an opportunity for team members to learn more about residents.

The newest life enrichment team member, Natalie McDade, especially found the program rewarding, Kim says.

“It really helped my newest staff member to make new connections and get to know our residents,” she tells The OMNIway.

“The residents enjoyed it as well; they have taken a real shine to Natalie. It was nice for the residents to focus on the positive aspects in their life.”

Residents wrote many different aspects of self-love on their hearts. Some wrote about how they love their children and grandchildren. One resident had worked as an engineer and he wrote that he loved his job as an engineer.

Kim says there is one resident craft that stands out for her.

“One gentleman wrote that he loved the fact that he is handsome,” she says.

Kim says the beauty of this program was how well it allowed residents to explore their lives and honour themselves with healthy self-promotion.

“It was a really great one-on-one activity because (life enrichment staff members) went around to their rooms, sat with the residents and got to know the residents better as well,” she says.

“It gave residents a chance to think about what it is they love about themselves because that’s not an easy question to answer. I think this was a great opportunity for them to look at themselves.”

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Frost Manor residents enjoy first live, outdoor entertainment since the pandemic began

Keith Kirkpatrick’s one-man show delivered an engaging performance the residents enjoyed

After a year and a half without live music at Frost Manor, residents were overjoyed when Keith Kirkpatrick brought his one-man show to the Lindsay, Ont. long-term care home for an Aug. 5 outdoor performance.

Keith is a long-standing favourite entertainer among residents, so it was fitting he would be the first live entertainer to perform at an outdoor show since the pandemic began, says Frost Manor life enrichment co-ordinator Amy Whitehead.

“He had reached out to us and I thought he would be a great (performer) to try our outdoor entertainment with,” she tells The OMNIway.

To keep everyone safe during the COVID-19 pandemic, Keith performed from the Frost Manor parking lot while residents sat socially distanced on the patio.

Keith performed two 45-minute sets for separate groups of residents in order to keep the gathering small. He had a microphone and speakers so everyone could hear, Amy notes.

The show was all residents had hoped it would be, Amy says, adding Keith always plays the songs residents want to hear.

“Keith has a really good mix (of music), and he tailors his act to the crowd,” she says. “We have residents who love Elvis, so he threw some Elvis in there, and we have residents who love Charley Pride, so he did some Charley Pride songs.”

Keith is also an engaging performer, Amy says. He has a large repertoire of songs, and he always tries to keep the music upbeat and will play numbers residents recognize so they can sing along, she says.

“He does a good mix of everything and he knows what the residents like.”

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Pleasant Meadow starts Residents’ Council Week with a council meet-and-greet and info session

Residents made decisions on council elections and learned about the important role councils play in LTC homes

Pleasant Meadow Manor kicked off the second annual Residents’ Council Week with a meet-and-greet session with Gord Holliday, the Norwood, Ont. long-term care home’s residents’ council president, followed by a question period and information session.

The Sept. 13 event largely focused on residents discussing the positions that need to be filled on the council. During the session, a decision was made to hold council elections in November, with nominees campaigning throughout October, says life enrichment co-ordinator Kim Williams.

Kim says excitement was in the air about the upcoming council election, and plans are now underway to get the campaign ball rolling.

“The residents were fired up about the upcoming campaigning, so we plan to make election posters for each candidate,” Kim tells The OMNIway.

Every Ontario long-term care home is mandated to have a residents’ council. Residents’ councils meet regularly to discuss issues important to residents and to help homes achieve continuous quality improvement.

Over Tim Hortons coffee and Timbits, Pleasant Meadow team members explained the responsibilities of residents’ councils and why they are an important part of every long-term care home.

Every resident also received a copy of the Residents’ Bill of Rights booklet provided by Community Legal Education Ontario.

Pleasant Meadow team members also informed the residents about the communication board where they can find the latest residents’ council meeting minutes as well as communications from the Ontario Association of Residents’ Councils (OARC), Family Councils Ontario and the Ontario Society of Senior Citizens Organizations.

Residents’ Council Week is Sept. 13-19.

The Ontario Association of Residents’ Councils (OARC) explains the crucial part councils play in the lives of long-term-care home residents.

“(Residents’ councils) bring residents together as peers to discuss issues of importance and to stay connected and engaged in home operations and decision-making,” the website states.

Click here to learn more about OARC.

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PHOTO CAPTION: Pleasant Meadow Manor residents’ council president Gord Holliday is seen here at the start of Residents’ Council Week at the Norwood, Ont., long-term care home.

Adjusting activities to meet safety standards has kept Pleasant Meadow residents engaged

From spiritual programs to bingo, residents have enjoyed many of their favourite activities during the pandemic, with staff working within the protocols to ensure safety

By making small changes to ensure safety and adhering to all ministry protocols, the Pleasant Meadow Manor team has been able to keep many programs the way residents enjoyed them before the COVID-19 pandemic began – even if there are some small differences.

With large-group programming on hold during the pandemic, the life enrichment team has been working hard to deliver the activities residents most enjoy, says Kim Williams, the Norwood, Ont. long-term care home’s life enrichment co-ordinator.

For indoor activities, groups must be kept to five residents or less, with social distancing measures in place.

Walking and exercise programs have remained in place and have been suited for one-to-one programming, Kim says.

Meeting residents’ spiritual needs has also been top of mind for staff, Kim says. Before the pandemic began, there were volunteers from several denominations who would visit Pleasant Meadow Manor.

Since pastoral volunteers cannot be at the home during this time, life enrichment aide Sheila Fleury has stepped into this role.

On Mondays, Sheila will meet with residents for spiritual readings with small groups or individually.

On Sundays, the home sets up the smart TV and streams sermons from YouTube for residents who wish to attend religious services.

There are residents of many faiths at the home and Kim says team members work to meet all of their spiritual needs.

“We are still trying to keep that spiritual connection for them,” she says.

One of the most popular programs, bingo, has also continued with a different approach.

Rather than giving residents poker chips to place on their cards, which was how the game was played before the pandemic, they use bingo dabbers which are sanitized after every use.

Board games are also offered for small groups of socially distanced residents, with one staff member moving the game pieces around the boards to prevent touching.

“We continue with as many of the activities as we can as long as we can wipe items down,” Kim says.

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Pleasant Meadow residents enjoy a virtual trip to Canadian Canoe Museum

Engaging tour taught residents a lot about canoes and they had lots of questions

Pleasant Meadow Manor residents were recently treated to a free, virtual tour of the Canadian Canoe Museum that was educational and piqued a lot of interest.

While the museum is currently closed due to restrictions in place during the COVID-19 pandemic, residents were able to enjoy a thorough tour of the museum via the smart TV at the Norwood, Ont. long-term care home on June 22.

Located in Peterborough, the Canadian Canoe Museum showcases more than 100 canoes and kayaks. The unique museum is dedicated to educating people about the role of the canoe in Canadian history.

During the virtual tour, museum staff explained the different types of canoes on display at the museum. Residents learned about the history of the canoe and how they are made, says Pleasant Meadow Manor life enrichment co-ordinator Kim Williams.

Everyone had lots of questions following the presentation, she adds.

“The residents enjoyed the tour and found it very interesting learning about the different types and ways that canoes were made,” Kim tells The OMNIway.

“They had a lot of pertinent questions that the staff were more than happy to answer, and it showed that they really were engaged during the whole tour.”

Residents enjoyed the free tour, thanks to a grant that has been provided to the museum by the United Way of Peterborough and the Government of Canada’s COVID-19 Emergency Community Support Fund.

The museum is offering free virtual tours to long-term care and retirement homes throughout Peterborough County. Click here for more information.

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Pleasant Meadow residents treated to virtual concerts over Father’s Day weekend

Fan-favourite entertainer Art Lajambe performed via video to help dads celebrate their special day

The dads living at Pleasant Meadow Manor were treated to a special virtual concert provided by one of their favourite local entertainers, Art Lajambe, who performed by video for them over the Father’s Day weekend.

During the Father’s Day weekend, the Pleasant Meadow Manor gentlemen got to enjoy white wine spritzers and snacks from the tuck cart while watching Art’s performances that were streamed through the large-screen smart TV in the activity room.

With protocols in effect to keep everyone safe during the COVID-19 pandemic, residents and their families could not be together inside the Norwood, Ont. long-term care home for Father’s Day festivities.

However, with Directive No. 3 in effect in Ontario long-term care homes, residents were able to enjoy safe outdoor visits with loved ones before the afternoon virtual performance.

While the performances may have been virtual, they were almost as good as having in-home entertainment, says Kim Williams, Pleasant Meadow Manor’s life enrichment co-ordinator.

“It’s almost like Art was here because he still talks to the audience,” she tells The OMNIway.

Kim adds that one of the great things about Art’s performances is the way he engages residents and encourages their participation.

“He’s got a great voice and he sings a wide range of songs for them, and they will sing along with him, and they always really enjoy him,” she says.

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Pleasant Meadow residents treated to a Mother’s Day spa

‘Our ladies loved it; some were still talking about it Monday morning’

Two Pleasant Meadow Manor team members provided the ladies living at the Norwood, Ont. long-term care home with a day of pampering just before Mother’s Day.

On their own time and at their own expense, care assistant Jamie Cochrane and personal support worker Jeanette Davis organized a spa day for the residents on May 7, the Friday before Mother’s Day.

Kim Williams, the life enrichment co-ordinator at Pleasant Meadow Manor, says Jamie and Jeanette transformed the home’s hairdressing salon into “a lovely, warm, relaxing and welcoming spa room.”

The spa Jamie and Jeanette provided residents included facial treatments to cleanse and exfoliate skin, and manicures to get nails looking their best.

Jamie and Jeanette practised COVID-19 safety measures to keep everyone safe, Kim notes.

“Our ladies loved it; some were still talking about it Monday morning,” Kim tells The OMNIway.

Jamie and Jeanette received lots of positive feedback from the ladies.

One resident remarked how she felt “spoiled” during her spa treatment while another resident said she was unsure of what to expect but was pleasantly surprised after her nails and skin received special care.

“I’ve never (been to a spa) before, but I’m sure glad I did go in,” the resident said. “It was very nice, quite lovely.”

Kim says the spa day was the talk of Pleasant Meadow Manor for a few days.

“All the ladies enjoyed showing off their nails; some of them had never worn nail polish and thought it was a special treat,” she says.

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Pleasant Meadow Manor redevelopment project moving along smoothly

Phase 1 of the Pleasant Meadow Manor redevelopment project is underway, and everything has been running smoothly for residents and staff members as workers prepare the grounds outside the home for the expansion, says Sandra Tucker, the Norwood, Ont. long-term care home’s administrator and director of care.

Because the work will eventually affect the area around the home’s kitchen, temporary kitchens located in four large trailers have been installed outside the home for the nutritional care team to prepare residents’ meals once work inside begins.

Workers have been on site since November when the first shovels went into the ground to start the expansion project which will see a two-storey, 34,000-square-foot addition to the south side of the home.

Once completed, Pleasant Meadow Manor, which currently has 61 beds, will have room for 35 more residents. Residents will live in three spacious neighbourhoods, each housing dining, lounge and activity spaces.

The new design will enhance privacy by eliminating three- and four-bed rooms. When renovations are done, 60 per cent of Pleasant Meadow Manor’s rooms will be private and 40 per cent semi-private.

Pleasant Meadow Manor’s new design will also accommodate a courtyard, gardens and outdoor space, and include a whole-home gathering area and chapel space.

Sandra says so far noise levels have been low and residents and staff have not been impacted by the changes going on outside.

The redevelopment project is expected to be complete by December 2022.

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