Riverview Manor team raises $4,500 for Alzheimer Society at Pulling for Dementia fire truck pull

The Pulling for Our Residents team from Riverview Manor pulls a 44,000-pound fire engine in the Peterborough Memorial Centre parking lot Sept. 16 during the fifth annual Pulling for Dementia fire truck pull fundraiser.

The Pulling for Our Residents team set a new fundraising record for the Peterborough LTC home

PETERBOROUGH, Ont. – Pulling for Our Residents, a 10-member team representing Riverview Manor, raised $4,500 in support of the Alzheimer Society of Peterborough, Northumberland and Haliburton on Sept. 13 during the fifth annual Pulling for Dementia fire truck pull fundraiser in Peterborough. Read more

Streamway Villa resident shares her story of living with early onset Alzheimer’s PART 1

‘Sally’ hopes her words will raise awareness of the condition’s progression and how it impacts her life

Streamway Villa life enrichment co-ordinator Christina Doughty did a series of one-to-one programs this summer with a younger resident of the Cobourg, Ont. long-term care home who has early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. Read more

LTC homes can help raise Alzheimer’s awareness during 24th annual Coffee Break

The Sept. 19 event, which is hosted by the Alzheimer Society, also raises money to support programs and services

September is World Alzheimer’s Awareness Month, and the Alzheimer Society of Canada is gearing up for its 24th annual Coffee Break fundraiser and awareness campaign on Sept. 19. Read more

Streamway reading program proving beneficial for residents with cognitive impairment

The activity is helping residents reminisce and encouraging meaningful conversations

Life enrichment co-ordinator (LEC) Christina Doughty says a book program offered at Streamway Villa is proving to be a valuable tool for engaging residents with varying degrees of cognitive impairment because of the reminiscing the activity brings and the conversations it fosters. Read more

Study shows music and dancing enhances quality of life for people with dementia

Life enrichment departments in OMNI Health Care long-term care homes have a long history of promoting music and dance programs, and new research is showing that toe-tapping to tunes is more than just fun – it also plays an important role in enhancing quality of life for people living with dementia.

Many people enjoy music and dancing throughout their lives, and people living with cognitive impairment show improvement on specific quality indicators when exposed to music and dance, according to the research.

During a period of 10 weekly sessions involving 22 participants, researchers at the University of Otago in New Zealand found that people with dementia experienced spikes in their sense of humour, imagination and intuition when played familiar music they could dance to after the sixth session.

The purpose of the study was to improve quality of life for people living with dementia using music and dancing to trigger memories and provide social engagement.

The findings, which were published in the July 2019 edition of the American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease & Other Dementias, “reversed the stereotypical understanding of this group of people being passive and immobile,” says lead researcher Ting Choo, in a statement on the University of Otago website.

“They responded to the music greatly and showed enthusiasm in moving to the music regardless of their physical limitation,” Choo says. “Positive responses such as memory recalling, spontaneous dancing and joking with each other were observed in every session.”

You can read more about this study by clicking here.

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IMPACT makes an impact at LTC conference

Artist Sara Dalla Guarda is pictured here with IMPACT, an interactive art installation she created to demonstrate the relationship between shattered objects and memories.

The art piece, designed by artist Sara Dalla Guarda and co-sponsored by OMNI, gets people thinking about Alzheimer’s and dementia in a different way

When Toronto-based artist Sara Dalla Guarda premiered IMPACT, an interactive art exhibit, at the Ontario Long Term Care Association (OLTCA) and Ontario Retirement Communities Association (ORCA) annual convention and trade show in April, she says she saw a myriad of reactions from people. Read more

IMPACT, an interactive art piece, demonstrates relationship between shattered objects and memories

Artist Sara Dalla Guarda is pictured here with IMPACT, an interactive art installation she created to demonstrate the relationship between shattered objects and memories.

OMNI co-sponsored IMPACT’s premiere at the 2019 OLTCA/ORCA convention and trade show. Artist Sara Dalla Guarda explains why she created it

It was last November when Sara Dalla Guarda’s father accidentally broke a ceramic mug that belonged to her grandmother. That mug meant a lot to Sara. Read more

Riverview BSO team receives first-ever Team Impact Award from the Central East LHIN

The team was nominated by PRC nurses from the PASE team at Peterborough Regional Health Centre

Riverview Manor’s Behavioural Supports Ontario (BSO) team received the Central East Local Health Integration Network’s (LHIN) first-ever Team Impact Award on March 26 for its work reducing and preventing agitation in residents who are living with cognitive impairment. Read more

Weighted blankets providing comfort to Riverview residents

Riverview Manor

Since being introduced by the BSO team in 2018, these special blankets have helped relieve anxiety in residents

Riverview Manor’s Behavioural Supports Ontario (BSO) team lead says weighted blankets have helped calm residents affected by dementia and other conditions that create anxiety since they were introduced to the Peterborough long-term care home a little more than a year ago. Read more

Ending the Alzheimer’s stigma: what LTC homes can do

Mary Schulz, director of education for the Alzheimer Society of Canada.

Engaging residents, families and local communities is the key to helping others understand the condition

Alzheimer Society of Canada director of education Mary Schulz says long-term care homes are well-positioned to help end the stigma attached to Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia because they are “communities within communities” that can engage others to debunk myths about the condition. Read more