Burnbrae Gardens residents miss OMNI vans

OMNIvan

‘It was a wonderful way for the residents to be able to get out,’ says life enrichment aide

Frank Trombley still misses the outings he enjoyed when one of the three 12-passenger vans provided by OMNI Health Care ended up at Burnbrae Gardens long-term care home in Campbellford where he lives.

The vans were rotated through OMNI’s 18 long-term care homes, and once every six weeks or so, Burnbrae Gardens had access to one of them for about six days.

“We used the van every single day it was here,” life enrichment aide (LEA) Karen Lloyd says. “We went everywhere. … It was wonderful to have them while we had them. Throughout the years we took many residents out in the van.”

Trombley says he loved getting out to the mall to pick out a special gift for his wife for her birthday or at Christmas. He also enjoyed a meal once in a while at a restaurant in one of the nearby cities – clam chowder with shrimp at the Red Lobster in Peterborough, for example.

“I miss outings,” Trombley adds. “We went on outings like to the fire hall; we went to the Canadian Air Museum; we went around to see the Christmas lights. My hobby used to be flying model airplanes, and when we had the van, I’d meet with a group every morning at the Tim Hortons.

“So I do miss all that stuff . … You know, if you’ve been here for seven years like I have, you sure like to get out once in a while.”
Lloyd says some residents still ask about the van and wonder when it will be at the home again.

OMNI Health Care made the decision to take the vans out of service less than a year ago largely due to new safety standards imposed through the commercial vehicle operator registry.

The new standards require all drivers to obtain a new type of licence, called a Class F licence, which could have been difficult for some staff, though Karen say she was completely prepared to work on getting it. In fact, she had studied all the material and was ready to write the required test when the news came that the vans had not passed the new safety review.

Burnbrae Gardens is now turning to the local public transportation available, including an accessible bus. It’s definitely not as cost-effective for the residents or as handy in terms of scheduling as the vans, Lloyd says. However, residents do still have the opportunity to get out, and a number will be enjoying a trip to the Quinte Mall just before Christmas.

In the meantime, Lloyd is happy to see a story shared about how much the vans were appreciated at Burnbrae Gardens.

“It’s nice to know other people will read it and see that we did enjoy the van when we had it; it was a wonderful way for the residents to be able to get out,” Lloyd says.

If you have a story you would like to share with The OMNIway, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 27, or e-mail michelle(at)axiomnews.com.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail michelle(at)axiomnews.com.

Riverview hosts another marvellous Movember

Riverview Manor life enrichment aide Adam Wicklum (right) poses with resident Fred Maybee during the home’s Nov. 30 party to mark the end of Movember. Twenty men from the home – 15 residents and five staff members – grew moustaches throughout November to raise money for men’s health programs. Maybee was awarded the title of “Man of Movember” for his moustache.

Riverview Manor life enrichment aide Adam Wicklum (right) poses with resident Fred Maybee during the home’s Nov. 30 party to mark the end of Movember. Twenty men from the home – 15 residents and five staff members – grew moustaches throughout November to raise money for men’s health programs. Maybee was awarded the title of “Man of Movember” for his moustache.

Peterborough LTC home’s residents and staff raise $1,720 for men’s health programs

It was Movember madness at Riverview Manor once again this year as life enrichment aide Adam Wicklum spearheaded the annual campaign to raise money to help tackle men’s health issues including prostate cancer, testicular cancer and mental health.

Riverview Manor’s Movember team raised $1,720 for research this year, up from the $1,600 raised in 2014.

Wicklum notes that a “huge” success this year was a major upswing in resident participation. This year saw 15 male residents grow moustaches throughout November in support of the campaign; there were three resident participants in 2014.

Five staff members participated in Movember 2015.

As part of this year’s Movember, Wicklum and other team members encouraged more physical activity. The reason for this is that the World Health Organization has identified physical inactivity as the fourth leading cause of mortality globally, contributing to 3.2 million deaths.

“In November, the life enrichment aides kept residents physically active with programs like shuffle board, mini putt, bowling, basketball throws, laughter yoga, air hockey, ball darts, physiotherapy and regular exercise classes,” Wicklum tells The OMNIway.

On Nov. 30, a party was held in the Peterborough long-term care home’s activity room to mark the end of Movember. The party included the presentation of the award for best moustache which went to resident Fred Maybee.

The Movember tradition, which began in 2004 in Melbourne, Australia, and has grown to become a global movement, sees more than one million men worldwide grow moustaches throughout November and raise money to support research into male cancers.

Riverview Manor’s Movember team has increased the amount of funds raised every Movember since 2012. Riverview Manor’s first Movember raised $415.

Wicklum notes that the vast majority of money raised during the Canadian Movember campaign goes directly to men’s health programs.

“Eighty-three per cent of all Canadian funds raised have been devoted to helping men live happier, healthier and longer lives,” he says.

Do you have a story you would like to share with The OMNIway? If so, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.com.

If you have any feedback on this story, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.com.

Streamway plans to create video about success of Music and Memory

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Program continues to improve quality of life for people with cognitive impairment

Streamway Villa’s Music and Memory program has been so successful at improving quality of life for residents with cognitive impairment that the home plans to work with The OMNIway in the new year to create a short documentary about the initiative.

Music and Memory is continuing to have a positive impact on Streamway Villa residents living with cognitive impairment, resulting in reduced administration of antipsychotic and antidepressant medications, fewer incidents of sundowning, increased socialization and less resistance to care.

The Music and Memory program trains people how to use personalized playlists loaded into iPods and related digital audio systems that help people living with cognitive impairment to reconnect with their environment through music-triggered memories.

“The majority of the time that we use the iPods, we accomplish the goal that we’re looking for,” Verleysen tells The OMNIway. “We see the reminiscing in their eyes, we see them clap and sing along.”

For example, one resident will stand up and start dancing – without using her walker or a chair for support – once she starts listening to her favourite music.

“It’s amazing to see,” Verleysen says.

This is the type of reaction Verleysen hopes to showcase in the video. Streamway Villa has captured these successes on video in the past. In July, she presented a video of a resident involved with the program who began humming to tunes and singing after listening to music.

To date, the Cobourg long-term care home has about 20 iPods, most of which have been provided through donations.

A recommended first step for any long-term care home interested in launching a similar project is to speak with family and residents’ councils about the proven benefits of using iPods, and encourage them to fund a project, Verleysen says.

Homes can also create an iTunes account to download music and get the ball rolling, she adds.

Music and Memory was started by Dan Cohen, an American social worker who found that when music was played through iPods for people living in long-term care homes, there was a remarkable improvement in their cognition.

The experiment was the subject of the 2014 documentary Alive Inside: A Story of Music and Memory.

Do you have a story you would like to share with The OMNIway? If so, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.com.

If you have any feedback on this story, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.com.

Editorial: OMNI’s people truly create an atmosphere of hope, purpose and belonging

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We have reached the end of 2015. It’s that time to reflect on the past year. While OMNI Health Care has continued its focus on enhancing quality across the organization from a corporate level, it’s truly the people working in each of the 18 long-term care homes that have made the greatest difference. Read more

Making a difference energizes Inspired Leader

Garden Terrace administrator Carolyn Della Foresta hugging one of her buddies at the long-term care home.

Garden Terrace administrator Carolyn Della Foresta hugging one of her buddies at the long-term care home.

Garden Terrace administrator will continue her inspiring leadership at Almonte Country Haven in the new year

Carolyn Della Foresta is committed to providing the leadership she does because she loves to see the ripple effect of positive results with residents as well as happy families and staff. Read more

Christmas outbreaks won’t dampen Garden Terrace staff parties this year

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Kanata long-term care home hosts celebrations early

For the past three years, Garden Terrace’s Christmas staff parties have had to be pushed to January as outbreaks inevitably occur around the holiday season. Read more

Country Terrace LEA also makes her mark in the wrestling ring

Country Terrace life enrichment aide Alicia Vanderhoven has another career – as professional wrestler Leah von Dutch. She is seen here with two of her title belts.

Country Terrace life enrichment aide Alicia Vanderhoven has another career – as professional wrestler Leah von Dutch. She is seen here with her title belts.

Alicia Vanderhoven’s other career has included tours with the WWE

It’s not unheard-of for people to have two careers, but Country Terrace life enrichment aide (LEA) Alicia Vanderhoven can certainly claim to have another job that’s both a little different and more exciting than most. Read more

Wildwood Care Centre proving successful at mitigating pain issues

Wildwood Care Centre

Wildwood Care Centre

Data shows home has exceptionally strong pain-management program

Wildwood Care Centre is showing the lowest incidence of residents with pain issues in OMNI Health Care’s 18 long-term care homes, according to the organization’s quality indicator chart. Read more