Programme for G8 Dementia Summit published

Information courtesy of UK Dept of Health

You can watch live coverage of the G8 dementia summit on the homepage of the Dementia Challenge site on 11 December and follow #G8dementia on Twitter.

The programme has been published for the G8 Dementia Summit on 11 December in London. It includes details of speakers, discussion topics and panel members. The event will be facilitated by Vivienne Parry, science writer and broadcaster.dementia-summit-logo

Speakers include:

G8 Ministers and the European Commission will deliver prepared statements as part of the opening session.

The topics for discussion during the day include:

  • improving life and care for people affected by dementia and their carers
  • preventing and delaying dementia
  • social adaptation to global ageing and dementia

The press conference will take place at 3pm.

You can watch live coverage of the G8 dementia summit on the homepage of the Dementia Challenge site on 11 December and follow #G8dementia on Twitter.

Read G8 Dementia Summit Programme.

 

Streamway staff save lives by donating blood

Home joins Canadian Blood Services Partners for Life program

November 29, 2013 — Jennifer Neutel 

When Christina Verleysen looked across the room as she donated blood and saw her Streamway Villa colleagues, she says she felt even more proud to be a part of the home.

“It was just amazing the response I got so it was definitely something that I will be doing again in January,” says Verleysen. “It brought us closer – it doesn’t matter what your position is at Streamway, everyone came together.” Photo From Canadian Blood Services.

“It was just amazing the response I got so it was definitely something that I will be doing again in January,” says Verleysen. “It brought us closer – it doesn’t matter what your position is at Streamway, everyone came together.”
Photo From Canadian Blood Services.

Fifteen of the Cobourg long-term care home’s staff members donated blood Nov. 20 at the Columbus Community Centre, thanks to the idea of dietary aide Tamara Dunn. Dunn approached Verleysen, life enrichment co-ordinator at the home, with the idea and asked if Verleysen could organize it.

“I’m a regular donor and I think everybody should do it if they can,” Dunn tells the OMNIway.

When Verleysen approached colleagues they were eager to give blood and understood the importance of saving lives.

“It was just amazing the response I got so it was definitely something that I will be doing again in January,” says Verleysen. “It brought us closer – it doesn’t matter what your position is at Streamway, everyone came together.”

According to the Canadian Blood Services every hour saves three lives, so through the 15 staff members 45 lives were saved.

Streamway Villa is now part of Canadian Blood Services’ Partners for Life Program, and will be in touch with the agency every other month.

Canadian Blood Services community development co-ordinator Crystal Powell says Verleysen was able to educate and recruit a large number of donors for their first blood drive. The home has a goal of 30 units of blood (one unit equals one donation, healthy donors can donate every 56 days) for 2014.

“I am sure they will far exceed this number given the great leadership of Christina and the obvious camaraderie and teamwork of its staff. I look forward to watching their lifesaving number grow throughout the year,” says Powell.

Among the benefits to workplaces for getting involved with Canadian Blood Services are saving lives, building staff morale and pride, providing employee development opportunities, having a positive public image and receiving recognition from Canadian Blood Services.

“New donors are essential to the continued success of our blood donor clinics and the Partner for Life program is a great way for organizations, groups, companies to become involved,” says Powell.

To learn more about the Partners for Life program or to join visit www.blood.ca. After joining, a community development coordinator gets in touch to answer questions, complete the registration process and develop an individual plan.

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 26, or email jennifer(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 26, or e-mail jennifer(at)axiomnews.ca.

Increased LHIN engagement would strengthen communication lines

OLTCA encourages homes to play leading role in LHIN engagement

November 27, 2013 — Deron Hamel 

OMNI Health Care president and CEO Patrick McCarthy says he hopes to see increased engagement between the organization’s 17 long-term care homes and the five Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs) they’re within.

Members of a panel discussion discuss the role the long-term care sector can play engaging with the 14 LHINs.

Members of a panel discussion discuss the role the long-term care sector can play engaging with the 14 LHINs.

This, he says, would create stronger communication lines as well as build upon successes already being seen by OMNI homes that are strongly engaged with their LHINs.

For instance, Rosebridge Manor in Jasper is involved with many of the South East LHIN’s mental health initiatives. Through its engagement with the LHIN, the home can listen to the mental health issues that come forward. Some of these issues have even made their way to the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care.

McCarthy’s comments were made Nov. 25 in an interview during the Ontario Long Term Care Association’s (OLTCA’s) Fall Symposium, an annual educational event that features keynote speakers, panel discussions and networking.

“It’s a two-way communication,” he said of home-LHIN engagement, following a panel discussion on the issue. “We can help (the LHINs) with resources at the home level (and) they can help us by informing us as to what the issues are on the ground that have a system-wide impact.”

When it comes to long-term care homes engaging with LHINs, there’s no one-size-fits-all approach, given the breadth of different needs and resources homes have, McCarthy notes.

For example, OMNI has several homes in the Champlain LHIN. But the two OMNI homes in Ottawa, Forest Hill and Garden Terrace, have different needs and available resources than Woodland Villa, which is located in Long Sault, just outside of Cornwall.

Even the physical structure of homes comes into play. For example, if an OMNI home wants to participate in a program that deals with mental health, does it have the capacity and staffing levels to do it?

OLTCA CEO Candace Chartier also emphasizes the importance of an individual approach to LHIN engagement.

“(The homes) know the residents they’re looking after and they know the community they’re in and they know the issues that they’re facing,” she said.

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or email deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

BSO an example of LHIN engagement success: McCarthy

Responsive behaviours reduced when resources applied

December 3, 2013 — Deron Hamel 

MARKHAM – OMNI Health Care president and CEO Patrick McCarthy says the province’s Behavioural Supports Ontario initiative is an example of the positive things that come from long-term care homes engaging with the 14 Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs).

McCarthy’s comments were made Nov. 25 in an interview during the Ontario Long Term Care Association’s (OLTCA’s) Fall Symposium, an annual educational event that features keynote speakers, panel discussions and networking.

BSO is a $40-million provincial initiative to help enhance quality of life for seniors affected by dementia and other conditions that cause agitation. Funding is provided to long-term care homes through the LHINs.

Much of the funding is put towards staff education — and by giving staff members the educational resources, they have been able to enhance quality of life for residents affected by Alzheimer’s and related dementia, McCarthy says.

“There has been a reduction in behaviours, but also a reduction in the use of medications as interventions,” McCarthy tells the OMNIway.

“We followed some residents who had PRNs (pro re nata medications — pharmaceuticals given on an as-needed basis) for antipsychotics and their use fell off dramatically because we were intervening, not with drugs, but with Montessori techniques, being a big one.”

All 17 of OMNI’s long-term care homes are involved at some level. In the Central East LHIN, Riverview Manor and Streamway Villa have been lead homes in educating other long-term care homes, both within in the LHIN and within the OMNI family.

Results from engagement with BSO have been impressive.

In its first year of involvement with BSO in 2012, Riverview Manor saw a 35.5 per cent decline in responsive agitation, while the rate of PRN medication administration dropped 34.4 per cent.

Likewise, Streamway Villa reported a large reduction in incidents of responsive behaviours, such as aggression, wandering, physical resistance and agitation, after team members began applying their BSO learnings.

From a corporate perspective, a major benefit from being involved with BSO, and thereby the LHINs, has been that best practices garnered through educational sessions have been brought into OMNI’s policies, McCarthy notes.

“We’ve been able to take their knowledge and learnings and we’ve been able to incorporate it into our Supportive Measures program,” he says.

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or email deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

Helping others is the OMNIway

Streamway Villa’s annual Christmas bazaar is an important event at the Cobourg long-term care home. Proceeds from this year’s event will go towards relief in the Philippines as well as to providing presents for two children in need through the Northumberland Mall’s Giving Tree.

Spirit of giving shining through at homes

December 2, 2013 — Deron Hamel and Jennifer Neutel 

OMNI Health Care long-term care homes have a long record of proving their commitment to residents and local communities, but when a large-scale crisis occurs the team members can also be counted on helping people who live far away.

This is evident with the relief efforts that have been coming from OMNI homes in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan, which devastated parts of the Philippines Nov. 8. The typhoon claimed about 4,000 lives and displaced about four million people.

OMNI’s two homes in Kanata, Forest Hill and Garden Terrace, have several staff members who are from the Philippines and, as a show of support, their co-workers wanted to help them with fundraising initiatives.

Shortly after the typhoon, Forest Hill personal support worker Jocelyn Geraghty was speaking on the phone with her mother who lives in the Philippines. Geraghty wanted to know what people in Canada could do to help. Since many people in the Philippines earn their living fishing, her mother suggested people raise money to buy boats so they could once again work. Many fishing boats were destroyed in the disaster.

Geraghty’s colleague, registered nurse Laarni Casiple, is also from the Philippines. Both staff members say even small donations will go a long way in helping people, adding that fishing boats typically cost about C$100 in the Philippines.

“We thought that, amongst us here (at Forest Hill), maybe we can help one family, because at the moment there is so much of an influx of support coming from all over the world to help the victims,” Casiple says. “The recovery is a long process. If we could help one family get a fishing boat, it would help them start.”

To help raise money for the relief effort, Forest Hill hosted a pancake breakfast on two shifts Nov. 19.

Like Forest Hill, Garden Terrace has also been raising money for the relief efforts. Following the typhoon, staff members at Garden Terrace rallied around one staff member whose family had lost their home in the storm.

The team immediately began a fundraising initiative.

Administrator Carolyn Della Foresta says the support the staff member has received has been heart-warming.

“The staff have been so kind and concerned about one another — it has really further brought to light the community we have amongst our staff members,” she says.

Streamway Villa’s annual Christmas bazaar is an important event at the Cobourg long-term care home. Proceeds from this year’s event will go towards relief in the Philippines as well as to providing presents for two children in need through the Northumberland Mall’s Giving Tree.

The initiative began when the home’s residents’ council vice-president came to life enrichment co-ordinator Christina Verleysen’s office, noting she had spoken with other residents and they all agreed these causes were what they wanted the bazaar proceeds to be spent on.

“It’s definitely going to be one busy Christmas, however, it’s going to be probably the best bazaar yet because of what we are putting the funds towards,” Verleysen says.

OMNI has also teamed up with the homes to raise money for relief efforts in the Philippines. The organization is matching donations raised at the homes. The Government of Canada is doubling every individual donation, so every dollar donated will be turned into $4.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

From part-time RPN to administrator

Neil Peterson reflects on his career path at West Lake Terrace

November 25, 2013 — Deron Hamel

When Neil Peterson took a part-time registered practical nurse (RPN) position at West Lake Terrace in May 2012 he didn’t anticipate he’d become the Prince Edward County long-term care home’s administrator less than a year and a half later.

But that’s exactly what happened. Five months after Peterson started his RPN position he was promoted to part-time clinical care co-ordinator. On Oct. 28, 2013, he became the 47-bed home’s administrator, filling the vacancy left by Mary Lynn Lester, who recently retired.

As clinical care co-ordinator, Peterson worked with team members on interventions to improve several aspects of resident care, wound care, continence care, and to reduce urinary tract infections (UTIs). His ability to work with others and develop buy-in for interventions was soon noticed by OMNI management.

“I had the opportunity to tighten procedures and show some initiative in getting the staff behind me in what I wanted to accomplish, which was reducing wounds, reducing UTIs and increasing compliance with incontinence programs,” Peterson tells the OMNIway.

Through interventions Peterson and West Lake Terrace staff members worked on reducing the home’s incontinence rate from 86 per cent to 54 per cent.

“We worked with all the departments to let the entire team have a part in the process, because you need to have a solid team,” says Peterson, who worked in information technology before embarking on a nursing career.

Peterson says what he has liked best about his new role is “being able to see the entire picture” of life at West Lake Terrace. He adds he also likes bringing the OMNI vision and values to the home.

“(OMNI) has really worked well — and worked hard — to have systems that work well as a corporation,” he says.

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or email deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

Frost Manor shows OMNI pride during local parade

Participation in event draws attention from community

November 22, 2013 — Deron Hamel 

Once again, Frost Manor participated in the annual Lindsay & District Chamber of Commerce Santa Claus Parade, which served as an opportunity to bring the home to the forefront in the Lindsay community, while offering a good time for some residents and staff members.

The Frost Manor team poses in front of the OMNI van during the Lindsay & District Chamber of Commerce Santa Claus Parade.

The Frost Manor team poses in front of the OMNI van during the Lindsay & District Chamber of Commerce Santa Claus Parade.

Decked out in costumes, the management team from the Lindsay long-term care home marched in front of the OMNI van, carrying a banner reading, “Frost Manor, Long-Term Care, Our Passion is People.” Other staff members and residents rode in the van during the Nov. 17 event.

Initially, the home planned to build a float, as it did last year, but because inclement weather was forecasted, the group decided to march in front of the van instead, notes life enrichment co-ordinator Vi O’Leary.

The home entered a float in last year’s parade, which was the first time Frost Manor had participated in the event in 20 years.

It’s an event O’Leary says she wants to see the home continue participating in because it brings positive exposure from the community.

“And it’s a lot of fun,” she adds, noting the three residents who joined staff members also had a fun day.

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or email deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

Small donations have large impact in Philippines recovery: Forest Hill staff

Forest Hill and OMNI reaching out to help those affected by typhoon

November 21, 2013 — Deron Hamel

A simple fishing boat costs about C$100 in the Philippines. With a fishing boat, people in coastal regions of the country can earn a decent living, and fishing boats will be the starting point for many Filipinos as they rebuild their lives in the wake of the devastation left by Typhoon Haiyan on Nov. 8.

Working with the Forest Hill team, OMNI Health Care has agreed to match donations dollar for dollar, and the Government of Canada is doubling every individual donation. In other words, every dollar donated to Forest Hill will be turned into $4.

Working with the Forest Hill team, OMNI Health Care has agreed to match donations dollar for dollar, and the Government of Canada is doubling every individual donation. In other words, every dollar donated to Forest Hill will be turned into $4.

Given the low cost of a boat, small donations — even a few dollars — will go a long way in helping people recover from the disaster, which claimed about 4,000 lives and displaced about four million people.

Many boats were destroyed in the typhoon, many residents of the Philippines would benefit greatly from even just a few fishing boats like a coleman crawdad boat for example. Once people in the coastal regions in the country’s north — where the devastation was most felt — have boats, they can start fishing again. The money they make fishing will help rebuild homes.

A small donation will be a long-term investment. This is the message Jocelyn Geraghty and Laarni Casiple want everyone to know.

Geraghty, a personal support worker, and Casiple, a registered nurse, work at Forest Hill. Both are originally from the Philippines and both have friends and family members impacted by the typhoon — Geraghty has relatives whose house was destroyed and Casiple has a friend whose brother is missing.

Geraghty and Casiple say they hope money raised at Forest Hill can help even just one family in the rebuilding process. In fact, Geraghty was speaking with her mother on the phone after the typhoon struck the archipelago to inquire about how she could help.

Her mother’s suggestion was to raise money to buy people boats.

“And then I said, ‘Yes, we can help with a boat,’ ” Geraghty says.

Adds Casiple: “We thought that, amongst us here (at Forest Hill), maybe we can help one family, because at the moment there is so much of an influx of support coming from all over the world to help the victims,” Casiple says. “The recovery is a long process. If we could help one family get a fishing boat, it would help them start.”

To help raise money for the relief effort, Forest Hill hosted a pancake breakfast on two shifts Nov. 19. Continued donations are welcomed.

Working with the Forest Hill team, OMNI Health Care has agreed to match donations dollar for dollar, and the Government of Canada is doubling every individual donation. In other words, every dollar donated to Forest Hill will be turned into $4.

Geraghty and Casiple underscore their appreciation for the Forest Hill administration team and OMNI for their support for people affected by the typhoon.

“We are very grateful to everyone,” Geraghty says.

If you would like to make a donation to the relief effort in the Philippines you can contact Forest Hill at 613-599-1991.

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or email deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

Garden Terrace staff, OMNI come together for typhoon relief

Administrator commends resulting team effort

November 20, 2013 — Deron Hamel 

Garden Terrace and OMNI Health Care have come together to support relief efforts in the Philippines in the wake of the typhoon that claimed the lives of approximately 4,000 people and displaced as many as four million others.

“The staff have been so kind and concerned about one another — it has really further brought to light the community we have amongst our staff members,”

“The staff have been so kind and concerned about one another — it has really further brought to light the community we have amongst our staff members,”

Typhoon Haiyan struck the Philippines Nov. 8. Garden Terrace has many staff members who are from the Philippines. Following the disaster, administrator Carolyn Della Foresta approached each team member from the Philippines to inquire about their families.

Fortunately, no team members lost family members to the typhoon, however, one personal support worker’s family lost their home.

Following the storm, one good thing did happen — staff members came together to support each other, Della Foresta says.

“The staff have been so kind and concerned about one another — it has really further brought to light the community we have amongst our staff members,” she tells the OMNIway.

To support people in the Philippines, the Kanata long-term care home has been raising money since Nov. 12 for the relief effort. At the time of this writing, $423 has been raised. OMNI has agreed to match donations dollar for dollar and the Government of Canada is doubling every individual donation. In other words, every dollar donated to Garden Terrace will be turned into $4.

If you would like to donate to the relief effort, you can do so by calling Garden Terrace at 613-254-9702, ext. 224.

OMNI has also teamed up with Forest Hill to raise money for relief efforts in the Philippines. Like with Garden Terrace, OMNI is matching donations raised at that home. In tomorrow’s OMNIway we’ll hear two Forest Hill staff members from the Philippines share their thoughts on events in their home country as well as about the support they’re seeing from their colleagues and OMNI.

Do you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway? If so, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have any feedback on this story, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

What happens when you combine luck, fabulous people and even a small glitch?

Maplewood hosts ‘astounding’ live auction

November 19, 2013 — Michelle Strutzenberger 

The night before Maplewood long-term care home’s inaugural live auction, Rachel Corkery dreamed the event had raised more than $5,000. Though she knew there was no way that would happen, the life enrichment co-ordinator (LEC) headed into work that day energized to think this could be a good omen for the event.

In total, the event raised, not $5,000, but close to $2,700, which, for a small long-term home in a small community is still very significant, says Corkery. Image courtesy of OMNI files.

In total, the event raised, not $5,000, but close to $2,700, which, for a small long-term home in a small community is still very significant, says Corkery. Image courtesy of OMNI files.

She shared her dream at the home, which fuelled the energy of the day as final preparations for the auction took place.

In the end, the evening event went off in a way Corkery now describes as astounding.

“We’re still glowing, days later,” she says. “We’re still getting feedback from people that they had such a wonderful evening.”

The evening began with a silent auction and a chance to sample “absolutely delicious” desserts and hot drinks prepared and served by volunteers.

A local band, the Bordens, struck up a mix of bluegrass, classic rock and folk music. “They were wonderful,” says Corkery, noting the home plans to have the band back for a resident birthday party.

About 7 p.m., it was time for the live auction, which featured a mix of about 30 items — from artwork to baked goods to a spa day pass.

The room at that point was so full Corkery had to run and find extra chairs in residents’ rooms.

Then she stepped up to the podium to announce the one hiccup in the otherwise perfect evening — that the auctioneer they had planned to have join would be unable to participate — and that she, Corkery, would be taking his place.

Admittedly nervous beforehand, Corkery says she found herself quite at ease once she started the bidding. She’s now thinking that glitch may have contributed to the event’s success. “I think my inexperience as an auctioneer allowed for the prices to go up a little faster than they might have,” she says with a chuckle.

In total, the event raised, not $5,000, but close to $2,700, which, for a small long-term home in a small community is still very significant, says Corkery.

“It’s about double what we raise in a typical fundraising event.”

Glitch aside, she attributes the evening’s success in large part to a group of “hardworking, fabulous” volunteers.

“At Maplewood we’re very lucky,” she notes. “We have a lot of volunteers who are committed to Maplewood and making sure that no matter what we do, we’re successful at it. It’s almost like they own Maplewood too.”

In addition to the volunteers, there were many community members who attended and showed their support of the residents of Maplewood by bidding — sometimes surprisingly high — on items.

The event would also have not been possible without the contributions from local businesses for the auction, says Corkery, who is a strong advocate of shopping local and supporting local businesses.

Local businesses have consistently demonstrated their eagerness and willingness to support the long-term care home, as well as other similar organizations, she says. “We wouldn’t be able to do our fundraisers without them. I can’t speak highly enough about shopping local.”

All of this support — from the long-term care home, volunteers, community members and local businesses — demonstrates to residents that they’re valued members of the community, Corkery says.

“There are some unique qualities about being a small home in a small town,” she adds. “We don’t get lost in a big city; we don’t get lost in a big home

“Our community takes care of us and we do our best to take care of the community.”

All proceeds from the fundraising will be directed to the residents’ council. A portion will be used to enable all residents to participate in a variety of outings. Residents’ council also sponsors part of the highly anticipated annual Maplewood family/resident barbecue and resident birthday parties.

The hardworking volunteers of the night Corkery would like to recognize include: Marg Catney, Carol Leadbetter, BJ Brideau, Cindy Phillips, Ron Peppy, Robyn Dilworth, Marilyn Page and Marianne Muston.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 27, or e-mail michelle(at)axiomnews.ca.