Posts

Streamway Villa receives OLTCA award for success with OMNI’s diabetes program

Streamway Villa administrator and director of care Kylie Szczebonski (left) and RAI co-ordinator Kerrie Chapple (right) are seen here accepting a Clinical Protocol Excellence Award during the OLTCA’s This is Long Term Care conference in Toronto Nov. 29.

Daily huddles, where staff talk about diabetes issues, have helped keep hypoglycemic events at near nil

Streamway Villa is one of the recipients of the Ontario Long Term Care Association’s (OLTCA’s) Clinical Protocol Excellence Award for its success with OMNI Health Care’s diabetes protocol. Read more

Strategy credited for reduced blood-sugar, skin-care issues

OrderSets

Comprehensive diabetes program enhancing quality of life at Pleasant Meadow Manor

Friday, August 8, 2014 — Deron Hamel

Since introducing OMNI Health Care’s comprehensive diabetes program in 2013, Pleasant Meadow Manor has seen improved blood-sugar control and skin issues have been eliminated, says Susan Towns, the home’s clinical care and RAI co-ordinator.

The Norwood long-term care home, along with Riverview Manor in Peterborough, piloted OMNI’s diabetes strategy last year, and the team couldn’t be happier with the results, Towns says, adding the protocols have significantly enhanced residents’ quality of life.

Having no residents with skin issues is significant, she adds, because people with diabetes tend to have higher rates of skin breakdown and healing time can be much slower than with people who do not have diabetes.

At the centre of the diabetes program is a group of evidence-based order sets addressing several aspects of diabetes care, including nursing assessment, dietary care, foot care and sick-day management.

The assessments can be used when residents enter long-term care homes as part of the admissions process.

Diabetes is a serious issue in long-term care, and its impact on quality of life is profound: fluctuating blood sugar brought on by diabetes can cause falls and the disease poses challenges for wound care. Diabetes can also lead to cardiovascular disease and stroke.

By having better control of diabetes, residents can avoid hospital visits, which in turn improves quality of life while helping to reduce the burden on the acute-care system.

OMNI received a grant from Boehringer Ingelheim (Canada) Ltd. and Eli Lilly (Canada) Inc. in February 2013 to help make this diabetes strategy possible.  Assessments were done in each of OMNI’s 18 long-term care homes in areas including hypoglycemic events, numbers of residents with diabetes, and the time required to resolve issues related to diabetes.

Physician buy-in crucial

When the diabetes strategy was introduced to Pleasant Meadow Manor, Towns says the greatest challenge was to get buy-in from the home’s physicians.

“And that’s the groundbreaking thing — you have to have your physicians on board,” Towns says. “You have to get them to agree to use the newer medications that are out there (and) they have to be willing to do the order sets.”

So, how does Towns recommend homes that want to introduce their own diabetes strategy get buy-in from physicians? She says it’s all about showing them solid results.

“With every improvement we made I just e-mailed the changes to our physicians,” she says. “It’s a work in progress but, for the most part, they’ve liked what we’ve done.”

On June 5, OMNI received the Innovation of the Year award from the Ontario Long Term Care Association for the organization’s diabetes program.

Do you have a story you would like to share with The OMNIway? If so, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have any feedback on this story, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

Woodland DOC confident diabetes program will improve resident health

OrderSets

Janna Sabourin says order sets will make a long-term difference

Wednesday, August 6, 2014 — Deron Hamel

SOUTH STORMONT, Ont. – While it’s too early to report any firm data on its success at Woodland Villa, the home’s newly implemented diabetes program is expected to reduce the sick days of residents with the disease.

Janna Sabourin, the Cornwall-area long-term care home’s director of care (DOC), says the comprehensive diabetes program introduced by OMNI Health Care in 2013 and recently incorporated at Woodland Villa will create a system of best practices that can be used to improve diabetic health.

At the centre of the program is a group of evidence-based order sets addressing several aspects of diabetes care, including nursing assessment, dietary and foot care, and sick-day management. The assessments can be used when residents enter long-term care homes as part of the admissions process.

“We can actually look at it when our diabetic residents become ill (and know that) these are the things we have to do — I really like that order set to try to make the sickness last less time,” Sabourin says.

Sabourin and other Woodland Villa staff members have also completed training from the Canadian Diabetes Association to help ensure the program’s success.

“It was quite a learning experience for us. I think the tools that are there are great and the physicians are really getting on board with using it,” she says, adding Nancy Bonaparte, Woodland Villa’s physician assistant, has played a large part in the program’s implementation.

Sabourin says the ideal outcome for the program would be to see fewer hypoglycemic events and improved blood sugar control and the elimination of blood sugar-related complications in residents living with diabetes.

OMNI received a grant from Boehringer Ingelheim (Canada) Ltd. and Eli Lilly (Canada) Inc. in February 2013 to help make this diabetes strategy possible.  Assessments were done in each of OMNI’s 18 long-term care homes in areas including hypoglycemic events, numbers of residents with diabetes, and the time required to resolve issues related to diabetes.

Diabetes is a serious issue in long-term care, and its impact on quality of life is profound: fluctuating blood sugar brought on by diabetes can cause falls and the disease also poses challenges for wound care. Diabetes can also lead to cardiovascular disease and stroke.
 
By having better control of diabetes, residents can avoid hospital visits, which in turn improves quality of life while helping to reduce the burden on the acute-care system.

For example, a hypoglycemic event can take more than two hours to correct. If a hypoglycemic event happens when there’s a staff shortage, it compounds the stress level and can prolong treatment. But with the protocols, team members can quickly assess the situation and resolve it in a timely manner.

In short, the program provides precise information on what to do in a timely manner when blood sugar-related illness occurs.

“Basically, the order sets are streamlining everything to make sure that everyone is on the same page when it comes to ordering insulin (and) when it comes to ordering medications for diabetes,” Sabourin says.

“We’re hoping to see less hypoglycemic events with our residents. We’re hoping to get blood sugar under control and to eliminate any complications that will happen because of diabetes.”

If you have any feedback on this story, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.