OMNI and Wildwood Care Centre learning from each other

Wildwood Care Centre

Wildwood Care Centre

Managing St. Marys home opens opportunities

Monday, January 6, 2014 — Deron Hamel

Since OMNI Health Care began managing Wildwood Care Centre in July, the long-term care provider and the St. Marys long-term care and retirement residence have embarked on a fruitful symbiotic relationship.

One of the strong points of the relationship, says OMNI president and CEO Patrick McCarthy, is that OMNI has been learning about some of Wildwood’s best practices that the organization can share with its other 17 homes.

Likewise, Wildwood has been adopting many of OMNI’s policies, such as supportive measures training, in an effort to introduce the organization’s culture to the home’s staff members.

“We’re sharing policies with them and moving them on to a platform where they can get full access to our policies,” McCarthy tells the OMNIway.

McCarthy says OMNI has been garnering valuable information from the 60-bed Wildwood Care Centre that can be shared within the organization.

For instance, Wildwood has a policy on needle-stick injuries that McCarthy says is “much more expansive” than OMNI’s current policy.

“(Wildwood’s needle-stick injury policy) is more inquiring, so it’s a much better system,” he says.

Wildwood Care Centre also uses a point-of-care tool, whereas OMNI homes do not, “so it’s a great opportunity for us to observe the positives and the negatives . . . we can learn from that when we start to roll it out in our homes,” McCarthy says.

Wildwood Care Centre’s administrator is Scott Walsh, whose family owns the home. McCarthy says OMNI is happy to be working with Walsh and is proud to have Wildwood Care Centre as a part of the OMNI family.

“We are really pleased to be working with him; it’s a great home in a great town in a great part of Ontario,” he says.

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or email deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

Accreditation, health record platform, managers’ forum some of 2014’s highlights

CEO Patrick McCarthy discusses what’s on the horizon for OMNI in coming year

 

OMNI-Brochure-image

Friday, January 3, 2014 — Deron Hamel

Preparing for accreditation, moving each of its 18 long-term care homes to the MED E-care health record platform and the seventh annual spring managers’ forum are some of the major highlights at OMNI Health Care in 2014.

In a recent interview, OMNI president and CEO Patrick McCarthy enthusiastically spoke about some of the key events to look forward to in the coming year.

At the moment, homes are busy preparing for Accreditation Canada surveyors to visit March 23-28. This is the third time OMNI has sought accreditation — three-year accreditation was granted to the organization and its homes in 2008 and 2011. The purpose of accreditation is to increase transparency and demonstrate that national standards of excellence have been met or exceeded.

“(Surveyors) will be visiting our homes and visiting our office, and we’re looking forward to a very positive outcome from that,” McCarthy tells the OMNIway.

OMNI has teams at each of its homes preparing for the surveyors’ visits and “they’ve done a great job,” he adds.

Another milestone OMNI will reach in 2014 is moving all but three of its homes to the MED E-care platform by the end of the year. The web-based platform helps long-term care homes provide better information around key quality indicators which, in turn, positions providers to maximize case mix index scores.

The tool also helps homes better manage resources to ensure the highest quality of care delivery.

“Our applications are designed to minimize care staff’s time documenting so that they have the opportunity to better assist their residents,” MED E-Care says on its website.

This spring, OMNI will host its seventh annual spring managers’ forum at Fern Resort near Orillia. The three-day event consists of workshops, presentations and activities for managers.

Prior to the forum, McCarthy says managers will be asked for their input about what they would like to see in the program to make it the most productive event possible where attendees walk away with valuable information they can use, McCarthy says.

He adds that the opportunity for managers to come together and network is one of the event’s strong points.

“I think people learn a lot from working with each other,” he says.

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or email deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

Wayne Rostad makes resident’s dream come true

Entertainer accepts invite to play at Almonte Country Haven

Monday, December 16, 2013 — Deron Hamel
Pat Schlievert is the latest Almonte Country Haven resident to have a wish granted by the Lanark County long-term care home’s Never Too Late to Realize Your Dreams initiative.

Having learned about the program through a story in the OMNIway in March, Pam Schlievert, Pat’s sister, revealed to staff members that Pat is a big fan of Wayne Rostad and asked the team if they could bring the singer, who lives nearby, to the home for a performance.

Almonte Country Haven resident Pat Schlievert is seen here with singer Wayne Rostad during a Dec. 6 performance at the home.Almonte Country Haven resident Pat Schlievert is seen here with singer Wayne Rostad during a Dec. 6 performance at the home.

Almonte Country Haven resident Pat Schlievert is seen here with singer Wayne Rostad during a Dec. 6 performance at the home.Almonte Country Haven resident Pat Schlievert is seen here with singer Wayne Rostad during a Dec. 6 performance at the home.

Administrator Marilyn Colton made some calls to get the ball rolling and, long story short, Rostad came to the home to perform for residents on Dec. 6, giving a special tribute to Pat.

Almonte Country Haven connected with Rostad in the summer, but the entertainer had engagements for the next few months and was unable to make an appearance at the time. As fate would have it, a holiday-time visit was available in Rostad’s schedule, which suited Pat just fine — she’s a big fan of his Christmas album, Christmas in the Valley, which he played during his visit.

“This really made (Pat) feel special; he came to her at the beginning and said, ‘I’m here because of you,’ which made her pretty happy,” Pam tells the OMNIway.

The March 4 OMNIway story about resident Pat Taylor having her wish granted to ride in an 18-wheeler was the spark that got Pam thinking of ways to have a wish come true for her sister, who moved into Almonte Country Haven in February.

Pam cared for her sister at home before Pat moved into Almonte Country Haven. With her sister living in a long-term care home Pam says she’s limited in what she can do for her — but whenever she can make a difference, she will be there for Pat.

Pam says she’s thankful to the Almonte Country Haven’s team for their resident-centred focus.

“I have to give kudos to Marilyn and the staff at the home — they really go the extra mile for residents and families,” she says.

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

Administrator underscores role of storytelling in strengthening health system

OMNIway stories capturing attention outside Ontario

December 13, 2013 — Deron Hamel

When a nurse in Nova Scotia was recently looking for information about the Behavioural Supports Ontario (BSO) initiative he did an Internet search and came across an OMNIway story about Streamway Villa’s success with the program that’s posted on the Central East Local Health Integration Network’s (LHIN’s) website.

Streamway Villa

Streamway Villa

From there, the nurse e-mailed Streamway Villa administrator Kylie Szczebonski to learn more about what the Cobourg long-term care home had accomplished through its involvement with BSO, a provincial initiative to help enhance quality of life for seniors affected by dementia and other conditions that cause agitation.

“And I gladly gave him everything that I had,” Szczebonski tells the OMNIway. “I sent him a lot about Central East LHIN and the whole (BSO) project, and then talked about Streamway Villa and OMNI and how OMNI is really taking off with our Supportive Measures program.”

Szczebonski says this illustrates the role OMNI Health Care and its 17 long-term care homes can play in addressing issues related to elder care in Canada.

Likewise, the administrator says the OMNIway, which is produced by Axiom News, can play a role facilitating this engagement via the success stories published on the website.

“We are in a media world. Google something you want to know and it will pop up, and that’s the way of the future,” Szczebonski says. “Because (the OMNIway) is online, the stories that are out there are going to catch on. A lot of the stories focus on our quality and that’s really what’s going to capture people’s attention — all everybody hears in health care is quality, quality, quality. That’s because quality is important.”

Szczebonski refers to the fact Canada is the only G8 nation without a national dementia strategy, an issue that’s received media attention this week due to the Dec. 11 G8 dementia conference in London. The administrator says OMNI’s homes and the OMNIway can play a part in bringing stakeholders across the country together through news stories showcasing what’s working.

Ideally, this information sharing could eventually lead to a nationwide strategy, Szczebonski says.

“We’re not copyrighting things because we want people to take what we’ve done and use it,” she says.

See the links below to read OMNI stories posted on the Central East LHIN’s website.

Documentaries deliver hope for long-term care leaders

Responsive behaviours, restraints, medication use decreasing at Streamway Villa

If you have a story you would like to share with the OMNIway, please contact newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

Cold and flu season is here

‘It only takes 20-30 seconds of your time to clean your hands’

October 31, 2013 — Deron Hamel 

With the arrival of cold and flu season comes the reminder of how important proper hand hygiene is in the effort to keep residents and staff members safe in long-term care homes.

Twenty to thirsty seconds of handwashing? Priceless. Thanks to healthandlifestyle.ca for the photo.

Twenty to thirsty seconds of handwashing? Priceless. Thanks to healthandlifestyle.ca for the photo

Long-term care home residents can be particularly vulnerable to infections. While homes are equipped with many hand-sanitizers and staff members do their best to keep their hands clean, it’s worthwhile, especially this time of year, to remind people about proper hand-washing techniques.

While environmental services departments work tirelessly to keep tables, doorknobs, handrails and other commonly-touched areas of long-term care homes clean, the most important defence is keeping hands bacteria free.

The Health Canada website explains proper hand-washing techniques:

– Wash your hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Alcohol-based hand cleansers are useful when soap and water are not available. In most cases antibacterial soap is not necessary for safe, effective hand hygiene.
– Remove any hand or arm jewellery you may be wearing and wet your hands with warm water. Add regular soap and rub your hands together, ensuring you have lathered all surfaces for at least 15 seconds — approximately the length of time it takes to sing “Happy Birthday.”
– Wash the front and back of your hands, as well as between your fingers and under your nails.
– Rinse your hands well under warm running water, using a rubbing motion.
– Wipe and dry your hands gently with a paper towel or a clean towel. Drying them vigorously can damage the skin.
– Turn off the tap using the paper towel so that you do not re-contaminate your hands. When using a public bathroom, use the same paper towel to open the door when you leave.
– If skin dryness is a problem, use a moisturizing lotion.

Oct. 21-25 was International Infection Control Week. The week, which has been recognized since 1988, is aimed at raising the awareness of ways to prevent infections in health-care environments.

“Cleaning your hands is an ordinary procedure and does not take a lot of time and effort,” the Community and Hospital Infection Control Association of Canada says in a statement.

“You can use soap and water or alcohol-based hand rub. It only takes 20-30 seconds of your time to clean your hands.”

Just Clean Your Hands, a Public Health Ontario initiative has education and training information for long-term care homes looking for ways to maximize hand-hygiene practices. Click here for the website.

What is your home doing to promote hand hygiene? If you have a story you would like to share, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23.

If you have feedback on this story, please call the newsroom at 800-294-0051, ext. 23, or e-mail deron(at)axiomnews.ca.

Patient-centred care key at OMNI Health Care

Inspired Leaders at 17 Omni Health Care centers. Photo Courtesy of OmniWay.

Inspired Leaders at 17 Omni Health Care centers. Photo Courtesy of OmniWay.

Inspired Leaders identify keys to success

July 21, 2013 — Jeanne Pengelly

It doesn’t matter which of OMNI Health Care’s 17 homes you go to, or which of the Inspired Leaders you speak with, the message is the same: Being recognized for outstanding contributions to patient care is certainly a key to employee satisfaction.

This year, OMNI’s senior management team chose to let each home choose its own “inspired leader.” The choices were made by peers and colleagues, and the winners were celebrated at the managers’ retreat at FERN Resort in Orillia this spring.

Without exception, each of the winners has divulged what they consider the secret to their success, and to their satisfaction with their position at their own home.

April Faux, for example, at Burnbrae Gardens in Campbellford, starts her day saying hello to colleagues and stopping to chat with them. She does the same thing when the afternoon shift starts.

Faux is always ready to assist her peers when necessary, another quality that seems to rise to the surface in OMNI Health Care homes.

“Anywhere that I can help, I will jump in if I can, and they really appreciate that,” she says.

A theme clearly evident in the stories Inspired Leaders tell is that the culture of OMNI Health Care encourages individuality, innovation and respect.

“People need to know that their opinion is valid,” Faux says, “and getting people’s opinions and suggestions is (important.)”

Brian Lafantaisie, for example, is a cook at Forest Hill in Kanata. His job tends to be a lot of the same thing, repeated again and again — exactly the thing that leads him to seek solutions to minor and major inconveniences in the process of preparing residents’ food. Not only are his solutions appreciated, tested, and embedded in procedure, but his colleagues and his boss encourage him to find those answers that make things easier and more efficient for everyone.

Kentwood Park nutritional services manager Catherine Reid was first drawn to the home by the mission and values that put communication and patients first. Now she says Kentwood Park is a workplace unlike any other she’s experienced.

“When you come in here you feel like you’re at home,” says Reid, pointing to the culture of respect that clearly puts residents first.

Even at the small 66-bed home in Selby, Ont., the atmosphere is one of respect and love. Environmental services and office manager Jane Hughes speaks of the “family atmosphere,” something OMNI Health Care managers try to put front and centre.

If there is a way to bottle the formula these employees utilize on a daily basis, it would encompass a system of care that incorporates outgoing personalities seeking to create a safe, comfortable home for each resident. It’s a method of care that includes respecting colleagues and residents, encouraging opinion and suggestion and embracing change with a smile.

Taking time with time

Simple solutions make short work of bigger problems

Small problems gain critical mass if one does not present a rapid, workable solution.

Meeting Needs

Dealing with difficult situations and behaviour

In this video we hear about alternatives in behavioural assessment.

Fern 2013 Riverview from The OMNIway on Vimeo.